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Civil War Blog

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2012 Additions to Civil War Veterans List – W to Z

Posted By on April 30, 2012

Veterans of the Civil War identified as having some connection to the Lykens Valley area and included in the Civil War Research Project was updated 19 April 2012.  In a series of post beginning Friday, 20 April 2012 and continuing intermittently for seven posts until concluding today, a brief sketch of each of the newly added names is presented along with a hyperlink to a specific post or list of posts where the name appears in the blog.

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W

George Wachtle (1837-xxxx) was a weaver from Dauphin County who served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  It’s possible he is the same person who also served in the 15th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private, but that has yet to be confirmed.  The surname is also found spelled “Wechtle,” and “Wachtel.”

George H. Wagner (1829-xxxx) served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, at the rank of Private.  He resided in Mahantongo, Northumberland County, and was a tailor.

Jacob Walborn (1839-xxxx) was drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private, but was reported as deserted about 20 days after he was mustered into service.  He was from Dauphin County. It’s possible that he was the same person who also served in the 78th Pennsylvania Infantry, but that has not yet been confirmed.

Peter Z. Wald (18xx-xxxx) is named in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, Civil War veterans’ list.  His specific service unit has not yet been determined.

William Wald (18xx-xxxx) is named in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, Civil War veterans’ list.  His specific service unit has not yet been determined.

Jacob Walter (18xx-xxxx) was named in a news clipping as G.A.R. from Lykens Borough, Dauphin County.  Research is ongoing to determine who this is. For clipping see:  Lykens Postmaster Henry Feindt.

Wiliam Walter (1825-xxxx) was a miner from Lykens Borough, Dauphin County, who served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.

Edward Walters (1845-1915) was said to be from Mifflin, Cumberland County [however, could be Mifflin Township, Dauphin County] whose occupation was miner.  He was born in Luzerne County.  He reported in the 1890 Census that he was getting a pension and was starved in the Andersonville Prison.  He served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  His wife was Mary Elizabeth Orndorff.

R. H. Wambaugh (1836-xxxx), who is also found in the records as Bailey H. Wambaugh, was a draftee from Halifax, Dauphin County, who reported to camp for duty in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private, and was discharged the same day on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.  However, he is also listed as having paid a substitute. See:  They Paid Subs.

W. W. Waters (18xx-xxxx) is buried at Methodist Episcopal Cemetery, Williamstown, Dauphin County, with a G.A.R. marker and a government-issued grave stone.  However, this may be a Spanish-American War veteran, Walter W. Walters.  The marker is next to the grave of Benjamin A. Walters, his father, who was possibly a Civil War veteran.

Henry Harris Weaver (1841-xxxx) was a draftee who served in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  He was from Lykens Township, Dauphin County, and his wife’s name was Sarah.  In 1850, he lived next door to Peter Crabb, a blacksmith.

Jacob Weaver Jr. (1836-1896) was a tailor in Elizabethville, Dauphin County, during the Civil War.  While he did not have any specific regimental military service, he mended and sewed uniforms for the area men who were serving.  His brother Benjamin Weaver did serve in the military.  Jacob was married to Lydia Ann Yount and is buried in Matter’s Cemetery, near Elizabethville.

John J. Weaver (1835-xxxx). a resident of Lykens Borough, was a cabinetmaker who served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private and as Principal Musician.  He also may be served as Drum Major.

William Weaver (1834-1910) may be confused with another person of the same name who was born about 1844.  The William Weaver of this record served in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private, according to the 1890 Census of Curtin, Mifflin Township, Dauphin County, and possibly had a wife named Rebecca, with burial in St. Peter (Hoffman) Cemetery, Lykens Township, Dauphin County.

Solomon C. Wiehry (1835-xxxx) enrolled at Donaldson, Schuylkill County, in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal, but was discharged, date unknown, on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.  In 1863, he was residing in Porter Township, Schuylkill County.  The surname is also found as “Weahry” and “Wiehrey.”

David Weiss (18xx-xxxx) served in the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, as a Private.

William Henry Weist (1843-1865), a farmer from Dauphin County, was killed at Shady Grove, North Carolina, while serving as a Corporal in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  His name is also found in the records as “Henry William Wiest.”

William Welker (18xx-xxxx), a different one than the one buried at St. Peter’s (Hoffman) Cemetery, Lykens Township, is buried at Salem U.C.C. (Hepler’s) Cemetery, Rough and Ready, Schuylkill County.  He served in the 143rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private.

Michael Wert (18xx-xxxx) was named as a Civil War veteran in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, list.

Charles White (1843-xxxx) was born in Mercer County, New Jersey and resided at Lancaster County when he enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He was a blacksmith.  Charles was captured at Rockingham, North Carolina, 7 March 1865.

Michael Whitmight (1831-xxxx), a draftee from Columbia County, arrived in camp for service in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private, and was discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificat3e of Disability on the same day.  His surname is also spelled “Whitnight” and “Whitenight.”

Andrew William (18xx-1879) is named as a Civil War veteran in the Oak Hill Cemetery list, Millersburg, Dauphin County.  No regiment has been identified as of this writing.

Samuel F. Williams (1841-1864) was killed by the accidental discharge of a rifle at Brandy Station, Virginia, 24 February 1864.  He was serving in the 26th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Sergeant, and was a bricklayer from Philadelphia.  See:  Leap Year Day, 29 February 1864.

William D. Williams (1830-1864) died at White House, Virginia, on 9 June 1864, of wounds received at Cold Harbor on 3 June 1864.  He was serving with the 184th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a 1st Lieutenant.  A letter to his brother was published in the Citizen Standard, 25 June 1993, telling how he was killed.  The letter was first published in the Miner’s Journal of Pottsville, July 1864.  His brother was David Williams of Schuylkill County.

George D. Williard (1844-1902) has a P.O.S.A. marker at his grave in Zion (Klinger’s) Cemetery, Erdman, Lykens Township, Dauphin County.  Research is ongoing to determine whether he had Civil War military service.

Daniel H. Wingert (1844-xxxx) was drafted into the service of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  He was from dauphin County.  His surname is found with various spellings including “Wingart” and “windard.”

John Francis Withers (1847-1898) is buried in Hampton National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia.  Late in life he was a resident of the veterans’ home there.  He was one of the Withers brothers who served as musicians in various military units including the 12th New York Infantry (National Guard or State Militia) and the 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry.  It is believed that he is the same person who also served as an Assistant Engineer in the navy in 1864-1865.

Joseph H. Withers Sr. (1841-xxxx) was one of the Withers brothers who were musicians in the military, serving in the 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry and the 12th New York Infantry (National Guard or State Militia).

Reuben Withers (1844-xxxx) was one of the Withers brothers who were Civil War military musicians.   He served in the 12th New York Infantry (National Guard or State Militia), the 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry, and later in the U.S. Marine Corps.

William J. Withers Jr. (1836-1916) was the most famous of the Withers brothers who were military musicians during the Civil War.  He had the misfortune in being the orchestra leader at Ford’s Theatre as the time of the Lincoln assassination and was supposedly in the path of John Wilkes Booth as he fled from the theatre.  William served in the 12th New York Infantry (National Guard or State Militia), the 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry, and possibly the 41st Pennsylvania Infantry.  He was married  and divorced from Jeannie Gourlay, an actress in the Ford’s company.  He died in Brooklyn New York in a home for incurables.

Isaac Witman (18xx-xxxx) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.

Cornelius Witmer (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

Elias W. Witmer (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

Ephraim Witmer (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

Gabriel Witmer (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

Jacob Witmer (18xx-xxxx)  was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

John Witmer (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

Peter Witmer (1841-1892) enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private, at New Market, Kentucky, but gave his residence as Dauphin County.  He was taken prisoner on 8 April 1865, but was present for muster out on 18 July 1865.  Peter had prior service in the 87th Indiana Infantry, Company E and Company D, as a Private, but was reported as deserted on 3 October 1862.  He was possibly married twice – to Angeline Overmayer and to a woman named Susan.  After the war he moved to Indiana and Kansas, the latter state from which he applied for a pension.

James G. Wolcott (18xx-xxxx) is buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, and is in the Civil War veteran list for that cemetery.  No regiment has been identified for his service.

Amos Mark Wolf (1841-1921) has a G.A.R. marker next to his grave at Calvary United Methodist Cemetery, Wiconisco, but he has not yet been located in the regimental lists.  His wife’s name was Sallie.

Elias Schlegel Wolf (1836-1910), a farmer from Dauphin County, enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, at Lykens Borough, Dauphin County. He held the rank of Private.  There is another person of the name “Elias Wolf” and their records might be co-mingled.  One of the individuals is buried at Witmer’s Cemetery, Union Township, Snyder County.  Wives associated with Elias could be named Elizabeth and/or Jane Strausser.

Gideon Wolf (1840-xxxx) is buried at Rough and Ready, Schuylkill County at Salem U.C.C. Cemetery.  He served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  According to information in the Klingerstown, Schuylkill County, lists, he was wounded while in the service.

Y

Andrew Yeager (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list as a Civil War veteran, but his specific regiment of service has not yet been identified.

John H. Yeager (1842-xxxx) served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  At the time of his enlistment, he was a clerk living in Berrysburg, Dauphin County.

John Henry Yeager (1843-1863) could be the same person who served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, but the records for this person point to the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company C, where he was a Private and the Bugler.  The residence at enrollment was given as Mifflin County (rather than Mifflin Township).  He died of chronic diarrhea at Alexandria, Virginia, 24 June 1863, and he’s buried in the Yeagertown Lutheran Cemetery, Yeagertown, Mifflin County.

Joseph F. Yeager (1843-1880) was a resident of Millersburg, Dauphin County, according to his enlistment information.  He joined the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Private.  There is also a record that this individual was a member of the 26th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company K, and possibly the 210th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, the latter company as a Corporal.  He married elizabeth Patterson.  After the war, he moved to Iowa.  His burial place is Clark Cemetery, Luther, Boone County, Iowa.

Josiah Yeager (1830-1890) has a G.A.R. marker at his grave in Peace Cemetery, Berrysburg, but no regiment has yet been identified in which he may have served.

Charles Yohe (1823-1898) has a G.A.R. marker at his grave in St. Peter (Hoffman) Cemetery, Lykens Township, Dauphin County, but no regiment has yet been identified in which he may have served.

Z

Jacob Zarber (1839-xxxx) enrolled at Berrysburg, Dauphin County, in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Farrier and a Blacksmith.  This could be the same person as Jacob Zerby.

Emanuel Ziegar (1830-1880), a Private in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, was a teamster from Dauphin County who had enrolled at Lykens Borough.  He was an immigrant from Germany and was married to a woman named Susannah.  The surname is also found at “Ziegar,” “Zeigar,” “Zeeger” and “Zeiger.”

Daniel Zimmerman (1823-xxxx) joined the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  He was a miner from Mifflin Township, Dauphin County.  His wife’s name was Sarah.  There was another person of the same name in Company H of this regiment who died in 1864.

Samuel C. Zimmerman (1831-1910) was a veteran who was married to Angeline Sheetz.  He had tree brother-in-law who also served, James Sheetz, Peter Sheetz, and William Sheetz.  Samuel was possibly a member of the 172nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, serving as a Private.  Samuel also had a brother who was killed in a mining accident at Stuart Mountain Colliery in 1888.

J. H. Zimmerman (1842-xxxx) resided in Llewellyn, Schuylkill County, at the time of his enlistment in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal.

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Comments

One Response to “2012 Additions to Civil War Veterans List – W to Z”

  1. Charles Weaver says:

    My Great grandfather Jacob Weaver is listed in your veterans list along with his brother Benjamin in which you said he did serve. Could you tell me which unit he did serve in. Thank you in advance

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