;

Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

2012 Additions to Civil War Veterans List – D to F

Posted By on April 21, 2012

Veterans of the Civil War identified as having some connection to the Lykens Valley area and included in the Civil War Research Project was updated 19 April 2012.  In a series of post beginning yesterday and continuing intermittently for eight posts until concluding at the end of this month, a brief sketch of each of the newly added names will be presented along with a hyperlink to a specific post of list of posts where the name appears in the blog.

——————————

D

William Danbert (1817-xxxx) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  At the time of his enrollment at Bradford County, he indicated that his residence was Tremont, Schuylkill County and his occupation was laborer.  In 1864, he transferred to Company K.

Isaac H. Dornsife (1820-xxxx)is buried in the Odd fellows Cemetery in Shenandoah, Schuylkill County.  At the time of his enrollment in Pottsville in Company A, 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, as a Private, he was a a butcher residing in Schuylkill County.  A few months into his service he transferred into Company I, but at muster out, he was absent due to being in the hospital.  The name is sometimes spelled “Darnsife” in the records.

Jeremiah W. Dornsife (1850-1926) is also sometimes found as “Darnsife.”  He served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A and Company I as a Private, later promoted to Corporal.  He was a laborer and a Schuylkill County resident.  At the time he filed for his pension, he was living in Massachusetts.  He married a woman named Mary J.

Thomas T. Davis (1844-1888) was located in the Calvary Cemetery, Wiconisco, Dauphin County where it was noted that he had served as a Civil War soldier.  Records were located for him in the 5th Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery as a Private and the Independent Battery H, Pennsylvania Light Artillery.  When he died, he left dependent children, for which Daniel Bowman was appointed guardian.  His wife’s name was Mary.  For prior post, click here.

Thomas Dawson (1842-1919) was an immigrant from England who served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability, date unknown.  At his enrollment, he was living in Llewellyn, Schuylkill County, and employed as a miner.  There is also a record that he served with the 53rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Sergeant, for one month in 1863.  Thomas was married to Rebecca .  He is found  in the records of the veterans’ homes in Hampton, Virginia, and Johnson City, Tennessee, where he resided for a time.

Asel Thomas Day (1828-xxxx) was the father of David W. Day (1847-1924) who also served in the Civil War.  Asel was a Corporal in Stephens’ Independent Company I of the Militia of 1863.  He lived in York County.

James Degnan (1838-xxxx) joined the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a substitute and at the rank of Private.  Records indicate he was a laborer from Philadelphia.

Daniel DelCamp (1837-1929) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, along with his brothers William DelCamp and Joseph DelCamp.  He was a miner from Schuylkill County.  In 1984, he transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps.  Daniel married Sarah Eisenbach.

Joseph DelCamp (1834-1915) was married to Rosanne E. Gunsette and is buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County.  He was a miner who resided in Schuylkill County at the time of his enlistment in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He also served in Company K of that regiment.  Earlier in the war, he had served in the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Sergeant.  See also Daniel DelCamp and William H. DelCamp.

William H. DelCamp (1842-1864) was the unfortunate brother of the three who served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal as he was killed at the Wilderness, Virginia on 6 May 1864.   See also Daniel DelCamp and Joseph DelCamp.

Albert Dennis (1847-xxxx), a miner from Cumberland County, was born in Schuylkill County.  He served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  After the war, he moved to Iowa and it was from there that he applied for a pension.

Samuel Detwiler (1827-1906) was an attorney in Dauphin County who took on the controversial defense of the Halifax Bank robbers in 1901, where a Civil War veteran, Charles W. Ryan, was killed in the course of the robbery.  Samuel was married to Elizabeth Matter.  No record has been found of Civil War service for him.

Henry Dietrich (1836-xxxx) was a clerk residing in Millersburg, Dauphin County, at the time of his enrollment in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  He later enlisted at Lykens Borough in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, where he received promotion to the rank of Quartermaster Sergeant.  He was not found on the muster out roll.  His wife’s name was Bridget.  Henry had not been previously identified in the post, Dietrich Family in the Civil War.

Barnhart Dillman (1826-1872) married Louisa Spander.  He was an immigrant from Germany who served in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  Draft records indicate a residence in Schuylkill County.  He is buried in Old St. Mauritius Cemetery, Ashland, Schuylkill County.  His first name is sometimes found as “Barnhardt” or “Barnhard.”

Jesse Ditty (18xx-1899) was identified as a Civil War veteran via a list of burials at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County.  No other information is known about him at this time.

John P. Ditty (18xx-1862)was also found on the Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, list as a Civil War veteran.  He died during the Civil War, but it is not known if his death was war related.  No other information is known about him at this time.

Theodore C. Dechant (1825-1902), who was known as “Theo” and was married to Hannah Elizabeth Patten, served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private (and possibly also as a Corporal), later transferring to Company K.  He enrolled at Berrysburg, Dauphin County, giving his residence as Dauphin County.  A carpenter by trade, he appeared in the Census of 1870 and the Census of 1880 as a resident of Millersburg.

William Dodd (18xx-xxxx) has a military grave marker in Calvary Cemetery, Wiconisco, Dauphin County, which notes service in the 8th U.S. Cavalry, Company L, as a Corporal.  There are no dates on the stone and there is no bronze G.A.R. star-flag holder.  It is possible that the noted service was post-Civil War.  Additional research is necessary. See:  Calvary United Methodist Church & Cemetery, Part 4 of 6.

James Dolan (18xx-xxxx) was first identified as a Civil War veterans through the Joliett, Porter Township, Schuylkill County, Veterans’ Census of 1890, where it was indicated that he was a marine on the U.S.S. Miami.  Previously, he was mentioned in the blog post entitled At Sea: Sailors, Marines, Merchant Seamen, Blockaders, Revenue Service.

Thomas Dolan (18xx-xxxx) was mentioned in a article that appeared in the Citizen Standard on 25 June 1993 entitled, “Some Locals Served with Confederacy.”  Thomas was from Minersville, Schuylkill County, and supposedly served with the Louisiana Cavalry (Confederate).

John Donnelly (18xx-xxxx) was identified as a Civil War veteran through the Veterans’ Census of 1890 for Joliett, Porter Township, Schuylkill County, as having served in the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H.  His wife’s name was Mary, but no other information is known about him at this time.

John Wesley Dory (1847-1914) was mustered into the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, at Williamsport, Lycoming County, as a substitute.  He held the rank of Private.  He married Sarah Emily Burkley and is buried in Hillcrest Cemetery, Clearfield, Clearfield County.

William Emile Doster (1837-1919) was a Provost Marshal of Washington, D.C. during the Civil War.  His home was in Bethlehem, Northampton County.  Prior to becoming Provost Marshal, he served as a Major with the 4th Pennsylvania Cavalry.  During the trial of the conspirators in the Lincoln assassination, he served as the lawyer for George Atzerodt.  He is buried at Nicky Hill Cemetery, Bethlehem, Northampton County.

Ethan Allen Doty (1837-1915) married as his second wife, Elizabeth Louise Scheib of Gratz Borough, Dauphin County.  His first wife was Ellen Elizabeth McFarland.  There is no record of Civil War service for Ethan although he was of the age to serve.  He was a wealthy paper manufacturer who established his business in the Reading, Berks County area now known as Papermill Road.

John Dougherty (1844-1862) was located in Matter’s Cemetery, Washington Township, Dauphin County with a G.A.R. marker at his grave.  It is possible that this is the same John Dougherty who was killed at Fair Oaks, Virginia, 31 May 1862, while serving with the 23rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Corporal.  However, the date of death on the stone appears to be 10 days earlier than the date of death in the military records – a possible error in either case. More information is needed to confirm the identity and service of this individual.

Levi Doutrick (1842-1864) died during the Civil War while a prisoner at Andersonville, Georgia.  He was serving with the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A and Company I, as a Private.  He is buried at Andersonville National Cemetery.

Israel Doney (1831-1906) is also found as “Downey” and “Danney.”  He is in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list but nothing is know of his exact service at this time.  He was married to Sarah Catherine Campbell.

Charles W. Dreibelbis (1845-1864) served with the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company M, as a Private.  He died 15 December 1864, at the U.S. General Hospital in Annapolis, Maryland and is buried at the Annapolis National Cemetery.

Charles Drum (1825-1897) lived in Mifflin Township, Dauphin County, in 1850.  He was drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  His name is also spelled “Drumm.”  His wife’s name was Christianna and he is buried at the Lutheran and Reformed Church Cemetery, Lower Augusta Township, Northumberland County.

Alfred Duncan (1846-1926) was a southern-born (North Carolina) member of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, who joined the Union cavalry at Motley Farm, Tennessee, in 1864.  Prior service may have been in the 2nd North Carolina Infantry (Union, Mounted Infantry) and he may also have served in a Confederate regiment (a person of the same name is found in Confederate records).  He was recorded as “absent on furlough” at the time the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry was mustered out.  He married a woman named Nettie and he is buried in Shady Grove, North Carolina.

Jacob Dressler (1840-1864) was a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He was captured and died at Salisbury Prison, date unknown.  At enrollment in Pottsville he had declared that he was a blacksmith and was born in Schuylkill County.

James Dunn  (1841-xxxx) was a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He was a Private in rank and the regimental records list him as a deserter as of 20 June 1865.  His original muster location was Philadelphia and he was a paid substitute.

Lewis F. Daniels (1831-1904) was possibly a member of the 33rd Pennsylvania Infantry (4th Pennsylvania Reserves), Company B, as a Private.  Also he was possibly a member of the 198th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Corporal.  The records of this individual could be co-mingled with another of the same name.  A wife named Eziza J. is found in one record and there is confusion over the death date for Lewis – one record indicates a widow’s pension application in 1863 and there are two possible other death dates, 1897 and 1904.  There is a Lewis F. Daniels who is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery, Aston Township, Delaware County.  Help is requested in sorting out the records of what may be two or more veterans of the same name.

E

Edward Earley (18xx-xxxx) was the Bugler in the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company C.  Military records indicate he was “not accounted for.”  It is possible that he had a connection to the Lykens Valley area, but that connection has not yet been found.

George Dalles Eby (1845-1934) lived in Mifflin Township and Wiconisco in Dauphin County.  He was a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G.  His rank was Private.  George married Emma C. Freeman.

William H. Eby (1841-1893) lived in Lykens Borough, Dauphin County at the time of his enlistment in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  He was married to a woman named Emma L., and he is believed to be buried in Shamokin, Northumberland County. He was a laborer.

George Emerich (1842-1921), who is buried in Jacob’s Cemetery, Pine Grove Township, Schuylkill County, served in the 214th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private.  His wife’s name was Louisa and he was a worker in the coal mines.  He is also found in the records as “George Emerick.”

? Engelbert (1877-1902) is noted as G.A.R. at the grave in the Calvary Cemetery, Wiconisco, Dauphin County, but because the birth year is given as 1877 (if correct) this grave could not possibly be for a Civil War veteran.  More research is needed, including the discovery of the first name of this individual.  A prior post referred to the daughters of a Mrs. S. E. Engelbert of Wiconisco, so this could be the individual in question.

Henry Enterline (1829-1905) is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County.  He was married to Sarah Martz.  During the Civil War, he was a reportedly Captain in the 19th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F.  There is a Henry Enterline who is named in the Dalmatia veterans’ list, Northumberland County.  Research in on-going on this individual.

Gabriel Enty (1846-xxxx) was an African American who was a Corporal in the 43rd U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), Company D.  He married Julia Ann Tarr and is buried in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County.

Jonathan Enty (1844-1864) was declared missing in action at Petersburg, Virginia, 30 July 1864, while serving with the 43rd U.S. Colored Troops (USCT)  He was a farm laborer from the Fountain area, Schuylkill County, and of African American descent.

Jonathan D. Etsweiler (18xx-xxxx) is named in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, Civil war veterans’ list.  Not much is known about his life or service.  Sometimes the name is spelled as “Jonathan D. Etzweiler.”

F

George Farber (1840-1900) was born in Germany and at the time of his enlistment, he was residing in Dauphin County where he was working as a carpenter.  He was a member of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, serving at the rank of Private.  He married Caroline Goerlitz and is buried in the Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, Lackawanna County.

Matthew Farne (18xx-xxxx) was named in the Citizen Standard article of 25 June 1993, “Some Locals Served with Confederacy.”  According to the article, he was from Ashland, Schuylkill County, and he served with the Louisiana Cavalry (Confederate).

Cornelius Faust (1846-1903) married Wilhemena Engle and is buried in the Shamokin Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County.  During the Civil War he served in the 84th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private, and in the 47th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Corporal.  His name is sometimes found as “Cornelius Foust.

Daniel E. Faust (18xx-xxx) is buried in the Shamokin Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County.  There is a possibility that he is a brother to Cornelius Faust.  Daniel served in the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, as a Private.

Jared Bohn Faust (1846-1911) was married to Hannah Schwalm whose mother was a Klinger.  He is buried in the Charles Evans Cemetery, Reading, Berks County.  No Civil War service has been located for him, but he was of age to have served.  He was a sculptor, and and he designed and fashioned the 93rd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument for the Gettysburg Battlefield.  Jared’s father was Reuben Faust, of Gratz Borough, a cabinetmaker.  The monument was constructed by the P. F. Eisenbrown Sons and Company (Eagle Marble and Granite), of Reading, Berks County.

John Feisal (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, veterans’ list for the Civil War, but no actual service information has yet been located.

John H. Felty (1840-1916) served with the 214th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private.  At the time of enlistment, he was employed as a laborer.  He married Elizabeth Behney and is buried in the Jacob’s Cemetery, Pine Grove, Schuylkill County.

Newton Ferree (1844-1928) was a soldier with the 84th Ohio Infantry, Company F and with the 157th Ohio Infantry, Company C, where he served as 2nd Lieutenant.  The Ferree family had roots in the Lykens Valley area and may have a claim to this veteran who supposedly discovered Abraham Lincoln‘s shirt collar in the State Box a short time after Lincoln was removed to the Petersen House. According to family records though, Newton was born in Fayette County, Ohio.  His wife’s name was Rose and he is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

Daniel Fessler (1827-xxxx) was named in a Shamokin Daily Item article as a member of the 151st Pennsylvania Infantry from the Shamokin, Northumberland County area.  Not much else is known about him.

John R. Fetrow (1839-xxxx) had a wife named Ida and he is buried in Leon Cemetery, Leon, Butler County, Kansas.  He served in the 130th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Private, and in the 47th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private.

Samuel Fetterhoff (1838-xxxx) joined the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private and was later transferred to Company K.  He enrolled at Berrysburg, Dauphin County and declared his residence as Schuylkill County.  His occupation was sawyer and his wife’s name was Mary Ann.

Peter Augustus Filbert (1833-1924) was a 2nd Lieutenant with the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D and a Captain and Lieutenant Colonel with the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B and at Headquarters.  During the 1863 Emergency, he served as a Major with the 39th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia) at the Headquarters.  He was married to Theodocia “Dotsie” Reitzel.  His burial place is St. John’s Cemetery, Pine Grove, Schuylkill County.

Jared Fisher (1821-xxxx) was living in Lykens, Dauphin County, and working as a blacksmith when he enlisted in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  His records show that he was born in Northumberland County and married a woman named Elizabeth.

Benjamin J. Focht (1841-1894) was a member of the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Corporal and the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal and Sergeant.  He was discharged from the service on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability on 18 October 1864.  He wife’s name was Annie and he is buried in the Charles Evans Cemetery, Reading, Berks County.

Joseph Ford Jr. (1845-1918) was a Private in the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K.  He was married first to Sarah Elizabeth Peters and second to Mary Elizabeth Lober.  According to information in the Dietrich family, he helped guard the Executive Mansion (White House) in Washington, D.C. from November through December 1863 along with fellow soldiers John Shoemaker and Henry W. Hoffman.

David Fornwalt (1837-1913) married Margaret Weiss and is buried in Bismarck Cemetery, Quentin, Lebanon County. He served in the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company E, as a Private and Corporal and on 13 September 1864, he transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps.  For a time, he lived in the veterans’ home in Dayton, Ohio.  David’s son Percy Fornwalt died in Tower City, Schuylkill County, and a grandson Edwin Fornwalt was a professional boxer.  The name is also found spelled “Farnwalt.”

Edward J. Fortman (1843-1914), a laborer from Lykens Borough, Dauphin County, enlisted in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private, and later in the 173rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  His wife’s name was Lavina.  It appears from available records that he spent some time in a veterans’ home and was eventually buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.  He could have had a sister Ann who was living in Tower City, Schuylkill County in 1904.  The records of this veteran could be co-mingled with another veterans of the same or a similar name.

Abraham Fortenbaugh (1838-1927) was born in York County and made a name for himself in banking and finance.  Although he registered for the draft in 1863, no record of Civil War military service has been located for him.  He was the president of the Halifax National Bank and present at the bank when it was robbed in 1901 and head cashier and Civil War veteran, Charles W. Ryan, was killed.

William W. Fortenbaugh (1847-1911) was born in York County and served in the 77th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private, and the 194th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Private.  He had a wife or wives named Avilda and/or Alice C.  He is buried in the Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, Dauphin County.

Christopher Fox (18xx-xxxx) was located in a cemetery list of Oak Hill, Millerburg, Dauphin County with an indication that he had served in the Civil War.  Specific regimental information has not yet been determined.

Peter Fox (1845-1864) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He had enrolled at Pottsville and had given his occupation as engineer with a Schuylkill County residence.  He was killed at Petersburg, Virginia, 17 June 1864, and is buried in the Poplar Grove National Cemetery, Petersburg, Virginia.

Thomas Foy (1838-xxxx), a member of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, may have also served in Company K.  He is listed in the records of both companies with the same muster dates.  This could be two persons or one person with an error in the records.

John L. Fralick (18xx-1898) is mentioned as a Civil War veteran in the records of the Oak Grove Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County.  More information is needed to determine the specifics of his service.

John Frank (18xx-xxxx) is also mentioned as a Civil War veteran in Oak Grove Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, records.  Additional information is sought on his service.

Christian Frankhauser (1830-1863) is buried in Lebanon National Cemetery, Lebanon, Marion County, Kentucky.  He was a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, and a Private in that regiment.  He was not present on the muster out rolls.

James Freeland (18xx-xxxx) is buried in the Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, with an indication in the records that he was a Civil War veteran.  More information is needed to determine the specifics of his service.

Charles Wesley Fribley (1835-1864) is the namesake of the G.A.R. Post in Williamsport, Lycoming County.  He served in the 11th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private, and in the 84th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Captain.  On 23 November 1863 he took command in the 8th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) and died in February 1864.  He was married to Catherine “Kate” Ault.

Jeremiah Fry (1847-xxxx) served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  He was born in Northumberland County and resided in Derry Township, Dauphin County, at the time of his enlistment.

Samuel Fryberger (1846-1896), who is buried in the Soldiers’ Circle at the Shamokin Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County, was a member of the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, in which he held the rank of Private and Drummer Boy.  On 17 September 1862, he was discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability and in 1864 joined the Veteran Reserve Corps. He was married to Margaret Gearing.  See also prior post:  How Many Samuel Frybergers?

Philip Furkel (1830-xxxx) was a member of the drafted 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, and he served as a Private.  Nothing much else is known about him.

Jacob Frick (1825-xxxx) served in the 129th Pennsylvania Infantry and according to family members has a connection with the Lykens Valley area.  Additional information is needed for confirmation.

——————————

The list will continue on Tuesday, 24 april 2012, with surnames beginning with G through J.


Comments

Leave a Reply

Please note: Comment moderation is currently enabled so there will be a delay between when you post your comment and when it shows up. Patience is a virtue; there is no need to re-submit your comment.