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Civil War Blog

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Deserters – 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I

Posted By on October 14, 2011

The focus in the blog post today is on those men who were drafted into Company I of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry and subsequently deserted.  To determine which men deserted, the roll of the company was examined.  Company rolls are found at the Pennsylvania Archives.  The roll of this company can be found on-line as follows:  :  page 1; Company I, page 2; Company I, page 3; and Company I, page 4.

As previously noted in other posts, the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry was a drafted militia to meet the call of Gov. Andrew Curtin in late 1862.  It was captained by Benjamin J. Evitts who was from Lykens Township and Gratz in Dauphin County and most of the men who served in the company were known to Evitts prior to his appointment as Captain.  During its nine months of service for the Commonwealth, it sustained no battle-related casualties.  Prior posts on Benjamin J. Evitts can be located by clicking on the tag, “Evitts Family.”  For prior posts on the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, click here.

DESERTERS FROM COMPANY I, 177th PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY

JACOB COLEMAN.  Born about 1822.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Deserted from Camp Curtin on 2 November 1862.  Jacob lived in Lykens Township before the war.  After he deserted, he moved about and eventually attempted (unsuccessfully) to apply for an invalid pension.  After his death, his widow, Elizabeth [Savage] Coleman, also attempted to get a pension based on his “service” in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry.  She too was unsuccessful.  The Pension Index Card which references the applications is shown below:

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JOHN LENTZ JR.   Born about 1835.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Deserted from Camp Curtin on 12 November 1862.

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MARTIN LUBOLD.  Born about 1827.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Deserted from Camp Curtin on 12 November 1862.

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DANIEL McCURTIN.  Born about 1821.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Deserted from Camp Curtin on 24 November 1862.

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JACOB WALBORN.  Born about 1839.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Deserted from Camp Curtin on 24 November 1862.

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Pennsylvania Veterans’ Index Cards are from the Pennsylvania Archives.   The Pension Index Card is from Ancestry.com.

The Civil War Research Project is seeking more information on the draftees who deserted from Company I, 177th Pennsylvania Infantry.  The men named above may not have previously been included in the Civil War Research Project, but if they have a geographic connection to the Lykens Valley area, they should be included – whether or not they served in other units during the war.  The fact that they reported for duty is enough for them to be included in the Pennsylvania statistics and in most of the databases of Civil War soldiers.  And, as can be seen from the above information, one is even found in the pension application records – applying for a pension he could not possible qualify for because of the desertion!

The post tomorrow will look at those who were drafted into Company I, 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, who paid to have a substitute serve in their place.


Comments

2 Responses to “Deserters – 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I”

  1. Diane REED MOORE says:

    I had three uncles serve in the 177th

    Israel, Abraham and Joseph REED

    Diane REED MOORE

  2. Diane REED MOORE says:

    OOPS,

    Israel H. REED is missing from your list of veterans that served in the 177th. The names of his two brothers are listed there.

    Joseph H. REED
    Abraham H. REED

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