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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

Marks Hornet – African American Soldier from Elizabethville

| April 22, 2016

In the 1860 Census of Washington Township, (Post Office Elizabethville), Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, there appears a family identified in the “Color” column as “m” for Mulatto.  The head of the family was Marks Hornet, a 38 year-old laborer.  He indicated to the census that he was born in Pennsylvania, that did not own any real […]

Philadelphia Mural Has Civil War Theme

| February 22, 2016

The second mural in the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program is found on 8th Street between Chestnut Street and Market Streets in Philadelphia and has a Civil War theme.  It is painted on the west-facing wall on the side of a building behind a parking lot.   According to the painted “plaque” in the […]

Further Research Needed on These African American Civil War Veterans

| February 19, 2016

Additional information is sought on the following African American Civil War veterans: From the Harrisburg Patriot, 21 April 1913: JAMES E. DENT James E. Dent, aged 72 years, died Saturday morning at his home, 1102 North Cameron Street [Harrisburg] after a long illness.  He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Post […]

Simon Gratz and the Virginius Affair

| January 2, 2016

This is another story about Simon Gratz (1842-1923), the son of Theodore Gratz (first mayor of Gratz, Pennsylvania), and the grandson of the Simon Gratz who is credited with laying out the town of Gratz and for whom the borough is presently named.  Although Simon Gratz was born in Harrisburg, the family moved to Gratz, […]

Simon Gratz and the Spy Capture Incident South of Harrisburg, July 1863

| December 18, 2015

Three Harrisburg Men Capture Confederate Spy in the River Col. Demming and Simon Gratz Who Caught “Rebel” Will Meet on Fiftieth Anniversary of Event According to Samuel Bates, an incident occurred on the Susquehanna River, south of Harrisburg, on 2 July 1863, while the Battle of Gettysburg was taking place, in which three Union men […]