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The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 102 – 110

Posted By on April 15, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features nine graves in the second circle, second quadrant, beginning with photograph 102.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 102 through 110.  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#102 – Unreadable

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This stone is badly weathered and unreadable.  The soldier buried here died between January 1906 and January 1907.

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#103 -Daniel ——–

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The first name on this grave marker appears to be Daniel.  The rest of the stone is difficult to read.  The soldier buried here died between January 1906 and January 1907.

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#104 -Unreadable

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This stone is badly weathered and unreadable.  The soldier buried here died between January 1906 and January 1907.

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#105 – Jonathan Rumberger

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Jonathan Rumberger was born in Dauphin County on 29 September 1825.  He is also found in the records as John Romberger and Jonathan Romberger.  During the Civil War he enrolled at Lykens Borough and was mustered into service in Pottsville, 30 September 1861, in the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  At the time he was working as a laborer.  On 15 February 1862, he re-enlisted at Brandy Station, Virginia.  On 15 October 1864, his company was merged into Company G of the 95th Pennsylvania Infantry.  On 13 August 1883, Jonathan Rumberger applied for pension benefits.  In 1890 he was living in Shamokin and complained of “deafness received in the war.”  After his death, his widow, Elizabeth [Snodgrass] Rumberger applied for pension benefits.  In recognition of his war service, he is named on the Pennsylvania Memorial at Gettysburg (as J. Romberger) and on the Lykens G.A.R. Monument (as Jonathan Romberger, not a member of the Heilner Post).

 

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#106 – Unreadable

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This grave marker is almost completely unreadable.  Based on the burial position in the circle, death occurred for this veteran between January 1907 and June 1907.

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#107 – William ——–

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While the first name of the veteran who is buried here appears to be William, the rest of the stone is badly weathered.  The surname could be Miller, but the middle initial is needed to identify the regiment and company as there are many of that name who served. This veteran died in 1907, prior to 26 June.

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#108 - Hawthorne Clare

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If the soldier buried here was named Hawthorne Clave, then he was born about 1831 in Scotland, and arrived in America before the Civil War began.  Two Civil War regiments have been identified for him including the 41st Pennsylvania Infantry (Emergency of 1863), Company E, where he served as a private from 1 July 1863 to 3 August 1863, and the 200th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, also as a Private, from 11 August 1864 through honorable discharge on 30 May 1865.    Hawthorne was married to Agnes Wright.  In 1880, he was living in Danville, Montour County, Pennsylvania.

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#109 – Henry Bordner

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This is a different Henry Bordner than had been previously identified as a Civil War soldier.  The Henry Bordner who is buried here was born 3 October 1834 and died 27 September 1907.  He first was drafted into service in the 173rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Private, and was mustered in on 2 November 1862.  On 24 November 1862, he was reported as “deserted.” He was caught and tried by a military commission and assigned to serve a nine month period in Company I of the 147th Pennsylvania Infantry for “time lost in the 173rd Pennsylvania Infantry.”  The Special Order  No. 151 was issued at Philadelphia on 14 December 1863.  The wife of this Henry Bordner was Ellen Ziders or possibly Mary (maiden name not yet found).  A pension application was made by Henry on 11 November 1890 and after his death, application was made for benefits for his minor children with the Guarantee Trust and Safe Deposit Company of Shamokin serving as legal guardian.  The widow also applied for pension benefits.  Care must be taken to separate the records of the two men named Henry Bordner, both of whom had Civil War service.  The other Henry Bordner served in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry and was buried at the Marion National Cemetery in Marion, Indiana.  See: Sergeants of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I.

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#110 – Unreadable

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This stone is badly weathered and partially sunken in the ground.  The soldier buried here died between 27 September 1907 and 11 January 1909.

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.

 

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 93 – 101

Posted By on April 12, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features nine graves in the second circle, second quadrant, beginning with photograph 93.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 93 through 101.  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#93 - John P. ——–

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Most of the lettering on this grave marker is readable, except for the surname of the veteran, who was born in December 1845 and died in November 1904.

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#94 – Daniel Fetter

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According to this grave stone, Daniel Fetter served in the 6th U.S. Cavalry, Company I.  He was born on 24 June 18– [year date is not clear] and died on 16 December 1904.  Not much else is known about him at this time.

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#95 – Israel Whary

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The name on this grave marker is Israel Whary, but he is found in the records as Weary or Wary.  Israel enrolled at Llewellyn in the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private, and served from 22 April 1861 through his honorable discharge in July 1861.  He was mustered into service at Harrisburg. At the time of his muster, he was a miner living in Donaldson, Schuylkill County.  In 1880, Israel Whary was living in Frailey, Schuylkill County, and by 1890 he had moved to Shamokin.  In 1903 he was working as a watchman for a colliery.  On 28 November 1887, he applied for a Civil War pension.  After his death, his widow, Annette [Bressler] Whary applied on 6 March 1905.

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#96 – William ——–

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Most of the wording on this stone is readable, but because the surname is unclear, this veteran has not yet been researched.  The first name is clearly William.  Is the last name Kessler or Bressler?  This soldier probably died in mid-1905.

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#97 – William Thomas

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Many persons of the name William Thomas served in the war – as well as men named Thomas William (or  Williams).  The William Thomas buried here was born in 1827 and died on 28 September 1905.  The regiment and company in which he served has not yet been determined.

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#98 – William Blyler

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William H. Blyler ( September 1845-19 December 1905) was a resident of Gratz Borough, Dauphin County, who was working as a laborer.  He served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, but was listed as a deserter on 11 May 1864 at Spottsytlvania Court House, Virginia.  Later he was found in the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry lists for Company G and Company F.  He was married to Mary Elizabeth Beck.  The records may be confused for this individual because he used the alias “William Clinger.”  Klinger was the maiden name of his mother.  William H. Blyler was previously featured in a post on 20 April 2012.  Military records indicate that he was a printer, was born in Dawsontown, Pennsylvania, and enrolled at Camp Stoneman, Washington, D.C.  He also was credited with a re-enlistment at Blaines Crossroads, Tennessee.

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#99 – Joseph Helt

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Joseph Helt served in the 104th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private from 9 March 1865 through 25 August 1865.  He had enrolled and was mustered into service at Harrisburg, where declared that he had been born in Dauphin County and worked as a laborer.  In 1870, he was living in Shamokin and working as a laborer.  On 3 February 1888, he applied for an invalid pension.  In 1890, he was living in the National Soldiers’ Home in Elizabeth City (Hampton), Virginia, where it was reported that he was suffering from general debility.  Joseph’s wife’s name was Amelia E. Helt who apparently did not survive him because no widow applied for his pension.

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#100 – Charles ——–

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A difficult to read stone for a soldier named Charles who died some time between 1906 and 1907.

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#101 – Unreadable

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Another difficult to read, badly weathered stone.

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.

Robert M. Palmer – Lincoln’s Minister to Argentina

Posted By on April 10, 2014

A biographical sketch of Robert M. Palmer appeared in the Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, published in 1893, and was authored by Samuel T.  Wiley.  It is presented below in slightly modified form.  It tells the story of the minister President Abraham Lincoln appointed to Argentina.

The Hon. Robert M. Palmer was born in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, 8 September 1843.  His father was a native of New Jersey, born at Mount Holly in the year 1820.  His grandfather, Judge Strange N. Palmer, was a son of Hon. Nathan Palmer, a lineal descendant of Miles Standish, settled in Pottsville in 1829, and remained a resident of that place for a period of thirty-six years.  Nathan Palmer was born in Plainfield, Connecticut, and in early life came to Pennsylvania, where he afterwards served in the State Senate for three years, having been elected by his Democratic constituents of Luzerne and Northumberland Counties.  Robert was nine years of age when his father removed to Pottsville, and in his youth began the trade of printing.  He passed through the usual route of the apprentice, and step by step reached the editorial chair of the Emporium.  While performing his editorial duties, he took up the study of law, and was admitted to practice before the Schuylkill County bar in 1845.  In 1850, he was elected district attorney of his county, and from that time forth took high rank as an able, careful , conscientious lawyer.  He allied himself with the Democratic party, and from time to time was prominent in its councils, when, in 1858, he was elected to the State Senate from Schuylkill County.  During the last year of his term, he filled the chair of Speaker of the Senate, and acquitted himself with honor and dignity.  His grandfather occupied the same position half a century before.  In the spring of 1861, he was appointed by President Lincoln as Minister to the Argentine Republic, South America, and sailed for that country in May of the same year.  His health began gradually to fail after a short residence there and his physician advised a change.  He resolved to return home before the end of the year, but on the thirteenth day of his voyage, 26 Apr 1862, he died, and his remains were buried beneath the waves of the sea.  He left a widow, , and Isabella [Seitzinger] Palmer, and six children, three of whom still survive, the second eldest being Dr. Charles T. Palmer, a well-known Eye and Ear specialist of Pottsville.

The story of Robert M. Palmer during Lincoln’s presidency could be followed by readers of the Philadelphia Inquirer, beginning on 31 Dec 1860.  On that date, Gen. Simon Cameron was called to Springfield, Illinois, to meet with Lincoln regarding a rumored appointment as Secretary of War.  In the same dispatch, it was reported that Robert M. Palmer of Pottsville would probably be elected as Speaker of the Pennsylvania Senate.

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After Lincoln’s inauguration, Robert M. Palmer was appointed “Minister Resident of the United States” to the Argentine Confederation.

From the Inquirer, 9 Apr 1861, we learn of his departure:

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HON. ROBERT M. PALMER – We learn that it is the intention of this gentleman to sail for the Argentine Confederation, to which Republic he has been accredited as Minister resident of the United States, about the first of May next.  The position which Mr. Palmer will fill is one of the most important to our Government in South America, but we re-echo popular opinion when we say that he is eminently qualified to discharge all its duties.  It is probable that Lin Bartholomew, Esq., of Schuylkill County, will accompany Mr. P as Secretary of Legation.

In the “en route” article appearing in the Inquirer on 19 August 1861, it is mentioned for the first time that Ambassador has been ill, but improving:

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HON. ROBERT M. PALMER — A letter has been received at Pottsville, from the Hon. Robert M. Palmer dated on board the barque “L. D. Carver”, at sea, 24 June, in which he says, we are now at latitude 70 degrees N., longitude 29 degrees W., and my health is improving.

According to the Inquirer, 19 October 1861, Palmer arrived in Buenos Aires on 6 August and reported the following to his family by letter:

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Hon. Robert M. Palmer

By letter from Buenos Ayres, dated 22 August, received here, the family of the Hon. Robert M. Palmer had information of his arrival on the 6 August, with health somewhat improved.  We have been favored with the following extract. 

“We landed in this city (Buenos Ayres) on the 6th instant, but the impending Civil War between the Province and the Government of the Confederation, has so entirely broken up the river communication with Panama, that we have been compelled to request Commander Macomb, of the United States war steamer “Pulaski, to proceed with us in his vessel to Panama.  This he has promptly and kindly agreed to do, but has been delayed at Montevideo for some days, waiting the arrival of necessary stores from Rio Janiero.These supplies have been received, and we are expecting the “Pulaski” here today o tomorrow, when we shall start at once to Panama. 

“We have sent a large package of letters, containing the details of our voyage, &c., by the English vessel “Montezuma” for New York.  I have concluded to send this short letter by the English steamer, to apprise you of our whereabouts and condition. 

“I am still feeble, but on the whole I think I am improving, and have great hopes from the approaching spring weather.  This is winter now, and some days are chilly and unpleasant.  “Our American and English friends here are very kind and attentive, and we found our letters of introduction very useful.”

 

Then, without further notice, the Inquirer reported on 5 March 1862, that Palmer had resigned:

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Argentine Confederacy.

Robert M. Palmer, of Pennsylvania, Minister to the Argentine Confederacy, has resigned on account of ill-health.  ex Governor Kirk, of Ohio, has received the appointment.

The Inquirer of 14 April 1862 reported Palmer’s plans to return home:

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HON. ROBERT M. PALMER – A letter from Strange J. Palmer, son of Hon. Robert M. Palmer, United States Minister to the Argentine Confederation, South America, dated “Panama, 7 February 1861 [sic],” says: “Father, I am happy to say, appears much better, and is sitting up today for the first time in a month.  About a week ago he was so low that the doctors considered his case a very doubtful one.  It has been excessively warm here, the mercury ranging as high as 105 degrees; but for three or four days past the weather has been cool and pleasant, and he has improved wonderfully.  He has written to the commander of the United States steamer Pulaski, at Montevideo, requesting him to come up with his vessel, and convey us to Buenos Ayres, so that we look for him daily at this place.”  Mr. Palmer intended, according to late letters, to sail from Buenos Ayres in the English steamer of the 27 April instant, which, with a prosperous voyage, would bring him home early in July.

But, unfortunately, on the way home, Robert M. Palmer died at sea, the fact of which was noted in the Inquirer of 16 June 1862.

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HON. ROBERT M. PALMER, Minister to the Argentine Confederation, died at sea on the 26 April last, while on his voyage home.  His health was not good when he left this country, and did not improve during his residence in South America.  Mr. Palmer was a citizen of Pottsville, and had represented Schuylkill county in the Legislature with decided ability, having been Speaker of the Senate for one or two sessions.  He bore a high character, and was an excellent and useful citizen.  His age was about forty-one years, and he leaves a wife and six children, the eldest of whom, a young man, accompanied him to South America. President Lincoln appointed him Minister to the Argentine Confederation soon after his inauguration, and he sailed from this country in May 1861.

A second article appeared in the same edition of the Inquirer of 16 June 1862, essentially saying the same thing:

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The North American & U.S. Gazette, 16 June 1862 added some additional information, including that he “was buried in the ocean the next day [following his death] and that “the sufferings of the sea voyage brought on the final struggle.”

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It is possible that because of his prominence in the Pennsylvania Legislature, a picture exists of Robert M. Palmer.  Since his burial place was “at sea,” the family plot at Charles Baber Cemetery in Pottsville does not contain his remains.  However, there is a memorial marker to the Palmer family which can be seen at his son’s page at the Findagrave website.  Additional information on Robert M. Palmer would be greatly appreciated.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.

In a future post, a brief biographical sketch of Dr. Charles T. Palmer will be given.  As noted in the opening paragraph of this post, he was an Eye and Ear specialist in Pottsville, but he was also a Civil War veteran.

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A copy of the Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania is available as a free download from the Internet Archive (click on book title and follow download instructions at left on page).  News articles were obtained from the on-line resources of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 80 – 92

Posted By on April 8, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features thirteen graves in the second circle, first quadrant, beginning with photograph 80.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 80 through 92.  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#80 – Unreadable

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An unreadable and heavily worn stone upon which only a few letters can be deciphered.

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#81 – Unreadable

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Another unreadable and heavily worn stone upon which only a few letters can be deciphered.

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#82 – Josiah Simmers

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Josiah Simmers was born in September 1842 and died on 15 November 1900.  He served in the 173rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private, from 8 November 1862, but was reported as deserted on 17 November 1862.  As a result of the desertion, he was tried by a military commission and on the issuance of Special Order #151 at Philadelphia on 14 December 1863, he was assigned to serve for nine months in the 147th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  His service began on 19 December 1863 and his honorable discharge was received on 19 September 1864.  He applied for a pension on 19 July 1890.  He is also found in the records as Josiah Simmons.

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#83 – Unreadable

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This stone is difficult to read.  Perhaps a reader knows who is buried here.  Click on the picture to enlarge it to see if the name looks familiar.  This veteran died after November 1900 but before 27 May 1901.

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#84 – William A. Culp

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This government issue grave marker is relatively new in that the death date of 25 May 1901 is noted at the bottom; earlier issued stones were not in this format.  It may be that a previous stone was damaged and the family requested a replacement.  William A. Culp served in the 8th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He enrolled at Shamokin and was mustered into service at Harrisburg.  At the time of his enrollment he was 24 years old, he resided in Shamokin, and was a laborer.  His military service was from 22 April 1861 to 22 July 1861.  There is possibly an interesting story here since two widow applied for his pension – one before his death year of 1901.  There is also another William A. Culp who is buried elsewhere in the Shamokin Cemetery who was also a Civil War soldier and who died in 1903.  The William A. Culp who is buried in the Soldiers’ Circle was born on 23 July 1834.

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#85 – Peter Trion

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Peter Trion or Peter R. Treon was born in July 1841 or July 1842 in Rebuck, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania.  He died on 28 June 1902 in Shamokin.  During the Civil War he served in the 172nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Private.  He was mustered in on 28 October 1862 and was mustered out with his compan on 1 August 1863.  He applied for a pension on 9 January 1880.  Peter also appears in the Trevorton Civil War list.

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#86 – Jacob Smith

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Jacob Smith enrolled at Milton, Northumberland County, in the 131st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Private and was mustered in on 14 August 1862.  One record indicates that he deserted at Camp Curtin on15 August 1862 but another record indicates that he served his full enlistment and was mustered out with his company on 23 May 1863.  At the time of enrollment, he said he was 22 years old and other records confirm this in that his birth date is given as 3 January 1839.  This Jacob Smith was a resident of Shamokin in 1890.  He died on 14 July 1902.  Prior to his death he had applied for a pension on 28 August 1890 and after his death his widow, Emeline Smith, applied on 21 July 1902.  There is another Jacob Smith in Coal Township, Northumberland County, in 1890, who served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry and the two should not be confused.

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#87 – Thomas Tarr

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Thomas Tarr, born about 1841 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, is the only known African American buried in the Soldiers’ Circle.  He served in the 45th United States Colored Troops, Company I, as a Private from 6 August 1864 through either the 15 August 1865 or 4 November 1865.  He appied for a pension on 16 July 1890.  He was married to Mary Entry (who could be Mary Enty- see Enty Family).  Twenty-three pages of military records are available for him.

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#88 - Unreadable

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#89 – John R. Dillon

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This stone is sunken in the ground but enough of the wording is visible to indicate that John R. Dillon is buried here.  John R. Dillon was born about 1836 and died on 26 March 1903.  During the Civil War he served in the 132nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, as a Private.  He enrolled at Catawissa, Pennsylvania, and was mustered into service at Harrisburg on 14 August 1862 and was mustered out with his company on 24 May 1863.  At the time of his enrollment, he stated that he was 24 years old, that he resided in Catawissa, and was employed as a shoemaker.  On 7 July 1884, John R. Dillon applied for an invalid pension and after his death, Amanda [Strausser] Dillon, his widow, applied for pension benefits.

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#90 – Unreadable

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This stone is badly worn and unreadable although some of the lettering is visible.  The veteran buried here probably died some time between the end of March 1903 and the middle of May 1903.

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#91 – Beneville Beissel

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Beneville H. Beisel was living in Hegins, Schuylkill County, in 1890.  His surname is variously spelled in the records as Bisell, Beisel, Beissel, Bisel.  He was born 9 June 1831 and died 10 May 1903.  His service in the Civil War included the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private, and the 95th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, in which his company was assimilated on 18 October 1864.  His service dates were 17 September 1862 through honorable discharge on 18 June 1865.  A reported Civil War-related disability was that he was “ruptured” while in the service.  Beneville applied for a invalid pension on 11 July 1883.

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#92 – Jacob Schroyer

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Jacob Shroyer (also found in the records as Schroyer and Schrayer), was born 30 June 1834 and died 29 June 1904.  There are several persons with this same name who served in the Civil War, but the one buried here served in the 2nd Michigan Infantry, Company B.  He was mustered into service on 18 May 1861.  It is unclear as to when his discharge occurred.  Jacob Shroyer applied for a pension on 5 July 1890.  His wife was Harriet [Rothermel] Shroyer.

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.

March 2014 Posts

Posted By on April 6, 2014

A listing of the March 2014 posts on The Civil War Blog with direct links:

The Charter of the Kilpatrick G.A.R. Post of Millersburg

February 2014 Posts

The Susquehanna River Flood of March 1865 (Part 1 of 2)

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 6 -14

The Susquehanna River Flood of March 1865 (Part 2 of 2)

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 15 – 23

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 24 – 32

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 33 – 41

Harrisburg Burning

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 42 – 50

Harrisburg Burning – Again

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 51 – 59

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 60 – 68

Events of the World: March 1864