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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

John McCollum – First Defender, Buried at Williamstown

Posted By on January 9, 2017

John McCollum is buried in the United Methodist Church Cemetery in Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Previously on the Civil War Blog, he was featured with the following information:

John McCollum (1833-1901). He is buried in the McCollum family plot and a ground marker notes his name as “John.”  Census records indicate he was born at sea while his parents were emigrating to America.  A G.A.R. star is mounted next to his stone.  John McCollum served in the 1st Pennsylvania Infantry from 20 April 1861 to 24 Jul 1861.  He and his wife Priscilla lived in Berrysburg and Williamstown where he worked as a stone cutter.  In 1900 he was a widower, living a hotel in Williamstown operated by Solomon Hess.

mccollumjohn-pavetcardfile-001

The Pennsylvania Veterans’ File Card, shown above from the Pennsylvania Archives, gives no new information about him or his service.

mccollumjohn-pensionindex-002

On 1 September 1890, John McCollum applied for a pension, which he received and collected until his death.  No widow applied, since John’s wife Priscilla had preceded him in death.  The Pension Index Card, shown above, is from Fold3.  Cemetery records at Sweitzer’s Memorial in Berrysburg confirm that Priscilla [Roop] McCollum died in 1871.  She is buried with her parents, Jonathan Roop (1812-1880) and Sarah [Bordner] Roop (1811-1888).  Priscilla’s grave marker notes that she was the wife of John McCollum (shown below).

mccollumjohn-wifepriscilla-gravemarker-001

It is possible that Priscilla died in complications from childbirth from a second or third child, but there is no record of this.  Priscilla and John McCollum had at least one child who lived to adulthood. He first appeared in the 1870 Census for Berrysburg – Harry B. McCollum, who was born 2 September 1867 in Berrysburg, and died on 25 April 1927 of prostate cancer in Wilmington, Delaware.  Harry is buried in the United Methodist Church Cemetery in Williamstown.

In 1870, the family was living in Berrysburg, where John was working as a stone cutter.

At this time, it is not clear where John or his son Harry were living in 1880.

When the 1890 Veterans’ Census was compiled, John was living in Williamstown, and he reported no Civil War-related disabilities.

Much more information is needed about John McCollum, particularly about his Civil War service and his years after his wife died.  Anyone who can add to this story can do so by commenting below.

 

December 2016 Posts

Posted By on January 6, 2017

A listing of the December 2016 posts on The Civil War Blog with direct links:

Introducing the “Lykens Valley Blog”

November 2016 Posts

Women and the Civil War (Part 4)

Who Was W. H. McDonald? – Named on Millersburg Soldier Monument

Women and the Civil War (Part 5)

Rev. Joel Light – Served in Valley View-Hegins Area

Women and the Civil War (Part 6)

Women and the Civil War (Part 7)

Jonathan Miller – Recognized on Tower City Memorial

Women and the Civil War (Part 8)

Women and the Civil War (Part 9)

Women and the Civil War (Part 10)

William T. McLane – Born in Millersburg, Died in Iowa, Ignored on Millersburg Monument

 

 

Women and the Civil War (Part 12)

Posted By on January 4, 2017

Women and the Civil War” is an exhibit of photographs and stories of women who had family connections with soldiers of that war.  It was first displayed at the Gratz Fair in September 2013, where it received “first place” in a non-profit division.  Afterward, it was displayed in 2014 at the Williamtown-Williams Township Historical Society; in 2015 at the Pillow Historical Society; and in 2016 at the Elizabethville Area Historical Society.  With the “retiring” of the actual exhibit, the photographs and stories are now presented here on The Civil War Blog in a thirteen part series.

For each of the thirteen series parts, one woman is featured first along with a brief description of her connection to a Civil War soldier.  For the other women who are pictured in each part, a brief story is not provided, but blog readers are invited to add their own stories as comments to the blog post.  In some cases, the women or the soldiers have been previously featured on this blog and links are provided to those posts.

EXHIBIT DESCRIPTION

Portraits and Stories.  This portrait gallery is of women from the Lykens Valley and beyond who were influenced by or had an influence on the Civil War.  It includes mothers, wives and daughters of men of the Civil War generation.  A few of their stories have been briefly told here [in the exhibit].  As part of the Civil War Research Project, photographs and stories of these remarkable women are being collected and preserved for future generations.  Over time, much of this history has been lost because it has not been recorded and saved.  For the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, it has been a priority to collect, record and preserve this valuable part of our heritage.


 

riegleharrison-wifehannah-portrait-451Hannah [Rickert] Riegle

wife of

Harrison Riegle

A WIDOW’S PENSION.  Hannah lived for 20 years after the death of her husband in 1899. She collected his Civil War pension which helped her purchase a small farm in Lykens Township and send two sons to college – one to become an undertaker and another to become a teacher.  The youngest daughter married the grandson of Capt. Benjamin J. Evitts, a neighbor.


tobiasthomasj-wifelizzie-portrait-450Lizzie [Wood] Tobias

wife of

Thomas J. Tobias


henningerhenryw-wifemaryjane-portrait-450Mary Jane [Romberger] Henninger

wife of

Henry W. Henninger


lehmanjohn-wifedena-portrati-450Dena [Koppenhoffer] Lehman

wife of

John Lehman


schminkydrisaiah-wifeportrait-450Elizabeth [Wiest] Schminky

wife of

Isaiah S. Schminky


clarkvalentinef-wifemercy-portrait-450Mercy Cordelia [Moody] Clark

wife of

Valentine F. Clark


rothermelwilliamw-wifesarah-portrait-450Sarah Ann [Schaffer] Rothermel

wife of

William Rothermel


goodjohnl-wifecassie-portrait-450Cassie [Schreffler] Good

wife of

John L. Good


sheetzpeter-daumaryedna-portrait-450Mary Edna [Sheetz] Beard

daughter of

Peter Sheetz


minnichcyrus-dauemma-portrait-450Emma Jane Minnich

daughter of

Cyrus Minnich


hessjacob-wifeellaportrait-450Ella [Roadbach] Hess

wife of

Jacob Hess


All currently posted parts of this series may be accessed by clicking on Women&CivilWar.  Photographs are scaled for printing on 4 x 6 photo paper without further adjustment.

Women and the Civil War (Part 11)

Posted By on January 2, 2017

Women and the Civil War” is an exhibit of photographs and stories of women who had family connections with soldiers of that war.  It was first displayed at the Gratz Fair in September 2013, where it received “first place” in a non-profit division.  Afterward, it was displayed in 2014 at the Williamtown-Williams Township Historical Society; in 2015 at the Pillow Historical Society; and in 2016 at the Elizabethville Area Historical Society.  With the “retiring” of the actual exhibit, the photographs and stories are now presented here on The Civil War Blog in a thirteen part series.

For each of the thirteen series parts, one woman is featured first along with a brief description of her connection to a Civil War soldier.  For the other women who are pictured in each part, a brief story is not provided, but blog readers are invited to add their own stories as comments to the blog post.  In some cases, the women or the soldiers have been previously featured on this blog and links are provided to those posts.

EXHIBIT DESCRIPTION

Portraits and Stories.  This portrait gallery is of women from the Lykens Valley and beyond who were influenced by or had an influence on the Civil War.  It includes mothers, wives and daughters of men of the Civil War generation.  A few of their stories have been briefly told here [in the exhibit].  As part of the Civil War Research Project, photographs and stories of these remarkable women are being collected and preserved for future generations.  Over time, much of this history has been lost because it has not been recorded and saved.  For the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, it has been a priority to collect, record and preserve this valuable part of our heritage.


 

keenelaura-actress-portrait-450

Laura Keene

THE ACTRESS.   She was one of the most famous actresses in America at the time of the Civil War, but had the misfortune of performing at Ford’s Theatre the night of the Lincoln assassination.  All of the members of the cast were suspected of taking part in a conspiracy and were detained.  Two days later she managed to flee Washington by train and was arrested in Harrisburg, but was released the next day by order of the Secretary of War. Her career never recovered.  In her waning days she played theatres in small Pennsylvania towns.


artmanenosr-wifecaroline-portrait-450-01Caroline [Foedere] Artman

wife of

Charles Artman


klingerisrael-daubarbara-portrait-001Barbara [Klinger] Underkoffer

daughter of

Israel Klinger


eckertjohnn-wifemary-portrait-450Mary Eckert

wife of

John N. Eckert


mcdonaldtimothy-wifedora-portrait-450Dora [Niver] McDonald

wife of

Timothy McDonald


bowmanhenry-wiferebecca-portrait-450Rebecca E. [Frank] Bowman

wife of

Henry Bowman


schminkydrisaiah-daulawgrace-450Grace [Wright] Schminky

daughter-in-law of

Isaiah S. Schminky


keiserjacob-motherelizhoffman-450Elizabeth [Hoffman] Keiser

mother of

Jacob Keiser


keiperjohn-sisterlaw-susannahrow-portrait-450Susannah [Row] Keiper

sister-in-law of

John Keiper Jr.


dilfieldelias-wifeellen-portrait-450Ellen V. [Keiser] Dilfield

wife of

Elias Dilfield


hooverhenry-wifelouisa-portrait-450-001Louisa [Zimmerman] Hoover

wife of

Henry Hoover


 All currently posted parts of this series may be accessed by clicking on Women&CivilWar.  Photographs are scaled for printing on 4 x 6 photo paper without further adjustment.

William T. McLane – Born in Millersburg, Died in Iowa, Ignored on Millersburg Monument

Posted By on December 30, 2016

mcclainwilliamp-pavetcardfile-001

William McClain, a farmer who was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and resided in Dauphin County, enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry on 21 February 1864, at Harrisburg.  On the same day, he was mustered into service in Company D, as a Private.  His personal information included his age of 18, his height of nearly 5 foot 6 inches, his brown hair, light complexion, and grey eyes.  The regimental records show that he served through muster out on 18 July 1865.

mcclainwilliamp-pensionindex-001

The Pension Index Card (shown above from Fold3) notes that William T. McLane applied for a pension in 1892, which he received.  The card also gives a death date of 27 October 1920 and a death place of Burlington, Iowa.

The Findagrave record gives the place of burial as Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Des Moines Co.unty, Iowa – and gives William’s place of birth as Millersburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  William’s father, Enos McLane, was also born in Millersburg.

One confusing issue in researching this soldier is the variation in the spelling of the surname, sometimes found as McClain, McLain, McLane, or McClane.  However, one thing is certain:  this is another case where a veteran of the Civil War with a connection to Millersburg has been ignored on the Millersburg Soldier Monument.  Increasingly, it is becoming evident that the monument only names a small fraction of men who should have been included on it.  It is not known why the research was so poorly done at the time the monument was erected just a little over a hundred years ago. With roots in Millersburg – and having served in a regiment and company with others who are included on the monument – and with William McLane still alive at the time the monument was erected – why was he not included?

Further information is sought on this soldier who served honorably and died at the age of 75.  Comments can be added to this blog post.