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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

Women and the Civil War (Part 2)

Posted By on November 21, 2016

Women and the Civil War” is an exhibit of photographs and stories of women who had family connections with soldiers of that war.  It was first displayed at the Gratz Fair in September 2013, where it received “first place” in a non-profit division.  Afterward, it was displayed in 2014 at the Williamtown-Williams Township Historical Society; in 2015 at the Pillow Historical Society; and in 2016 at the Elizabethville Area Historical Society.  With the “retiring” of the actual exhibit, the photographs and stories are now presented here on The Civil War Blog in a thirteen part series.

For each of the thirteen series parts, one woman is featured first along with a brief description of her connection to a Civil War soldier.  For the other women who are pictured in each part, a brief story is not provided, but blog readers are invited to add their own stories as comments to the blog post.  In some cases, the women or the soldiers have been previously featured on this blog and links are provided to those posts.

EXHIBIT DESCRIPTION

Portraits and Stories.  This portrait gallery is of women from the Lykens Valley and beyond who were influenced by or had an influence on the Civil War.  It includes mothers, wives and daughters of men of the Civil War generation.  A few of their stories have been briefly told here [in the exhibit].  As part of the Civil War Research Project, photographs and stories of these remarkable women are being collected and preserved for future generations.  Over time, much of this history has been lost because it has not been recorded and saved.  For the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, it has been a priority to collect, record and preserve this valuable part of our heritage.


 

gratzjohnc-pensionindex-001bAnne Ellen [Carson] Gratz

mother of

John C. Gratz

Her son, while serving with the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, died of typhoid fever at Camp Northumberland, Virginia, in January 1862, and her husband, Theodore Gratz, former mayor of Gratz, Pennsylvania, died in Harrisburg in September 1863, leaving her with four young children.  With no means of support other than her older children, she decided to apply for pension benefits because her son John died in the war.   The record from the National Archives shows that she did not receive a Civil War pension.


schwalmfredericks-wifesarah-portrait-450Sarah [Rubendall] Schwalm

wife of

Frederick S. Schwalm


evittsbenjamin-wifesarahyeager-portrait-450-001Sarah Ann [Yeager] Evitts

wife of

Benjamin J. Evitts


thomaselias-wifesarah-portrait-450Sarah [Rough] Thomas

wife of

Elias Thomas


hawkwilliam-wifesarah-portrati-450Sarah [Kocher] Hawk

wife of

William Hawk


kembelisaac-wifematilda-portrait-451Matilda [Bickel] Kembel

wife of

Isaac Kembel


riegleharrison-sistlaw-beckyrickert-450Becky Rickert

sister-in-law of

Harrison Riegle


kembelisaac-wifematilda-portrait-450Matilda [Bickel] Kembel

wife of

Isaac Kembel


thomaselias-daueliza-portrait-450Eliza Thomas

daughter of

Elias Thomas


hoffmancornelius-dauagnes-portrait-450-001Agnes [Hoffman] Sheetz

daughter of

Cornelius Hoffman


williardjohnl-wifeeliza-portrait-451

Eliza Thomas

wife of

John L. Williard


All currently posted parts of this series may be accessed by clicking on Women&CivilWar.  Photographs are scaled for printing on 4 x 6 photo paper without further adjustment.

Isaac E. Marks – Merchant of Tremont

Posted By on November 18, 2016

marksisaace-hbgdlyind-1905-02-17-001

The Harrisburg Daily Independent, 17 February 1905, printed a brief notice of the death of Isaac E. Marks of Tremont:

Isaac Marks, a prominent Tremont, Schuylkill County, citizen and retired merchant, is dead of pneumonia at his home, aged 62 years.  He was a veteran of the civil war.

marksisaace-pavetcardfile-001

As shown by the Pennsylvania Veterans’ File Card (above from the Pennsylvania Archives), Isaac Marks enrolled on 27 August 1861 at Harrisburg, and was mustered into the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company I, as a Private, on 3 September 1861.  He was 21 years old at the time, stood 5 foot 9 inches tall, had light complexion and light hair, grey eyes, and was employed as a watchmaker.  His residence was Tremont, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, where he also was born.

On 28 November 1863, Isaac re-enlisted in the same regiment and company at Huntsville, Alabama, and on 9 June 1865, he was promoted to the rank of Corporal.   On 23 August 1865, he was honorably mustered out with his company.

marksisaace-pensionindex-001

On 30 June 1880, Isaac Marks applied for a Civil War pension, which he received and collected until his death, and afterward, his widow Caroline applied and received benefits until her death. The Pension Index Card, shown above, is from Ancestry.com.

In 1890, Isaac Marks was living in Tremont.  He reported his service in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry and did not report any disabilities as a result of that service.

From all presently known information, other than the Civil War, Isaac spent his entire life in Tremont.

Any readers who can offer additional information can do so by adding a comment to this post.

William Lebo – Medical Doctor at Hegins

Posted By on November 16, 2016

lebowilliam-medschoolportrait-001

The photograph shows Dr. William C. Lebo working on a cadaver while a student at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, some time after the Civil War.  In the 1870 census of Gratz Borough, Dauphin County, he indicated he was a medical student and was living in the household of his brother-in-law, Henry R. Lehr, who was a store clerk at the time.  Dr. Lebo is second from the right in the photograph.

William C. Lebo was the son of Daniel Lebo (1812-1871), a carpenter, and Sarah [Schoffstall] Lebo (1824-1883), and was born 1 October 1847 in Lykens Township, Dauphin County.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dr. Lebo died on 10 November 1920 and is buried at St. Andrew’s Methodist Cemetery in Valley View, Schuylkill County.  At his grave is a G.A.R. Star-Flag Holder.

What specifically was his Civil War service?

The following is presented as a possible match for the William Lebo who is buried at Valley View:

lebowilliam-pavetcardfile-001

On 29 October 1862, a William Lebo enrolled in the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company M, as a Private.  He claimed he was 18 years old. One day later, at Camp Curtin, he was mustered into service.  At some time during the war, he transferred to Company G of the same regiment, and it was from that company that he received an honorable discharge on 11 August 1865.

lebowilliam-gettysburgpamem-001

For his service at Gettysburg in July 1863, he is named on the Pennsylvania Memorial (Company M).

At this time, not much else is known about his military service.

lebowilliam-pensionindex-001

In 1882, the William Lebo who served in the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry applied for an invalid pension based on his Civil War service.  He received the pension and collected until his death, but it appears from the card (shown above from Ancestry.com) that a widow, Sarah Lebo, applied on 4 June 1910.  So, if the information on the Pension Index Card is correct, this service record could not be for the Dr. William Lebo who died in 1920 and is buried at Valley View.

Please add comments to this post.

 

 

 

Women and the Civil War (Part 1)

Posted By on November 14, 2016

Women and the Civil War” is an exhibit of photographs and stories of women who had family connections with soldiers of that war.  It was first displayed at the Gratz Fair in September 2013, where it received “first place” in a non-profit division.  Afterward, it was displayed in 2014 at the Williamtown-Williams Township Historical Society; in 2015 at the Pillow Historical Society; and in 2016 at the Elizabethville Area Historical Society.  With the “retiring” of the actual exhibit, the photographs and stories are now presented here on The Civil War Blog in a thirteen part series, beginning today.

For each of the thirteen series parts, one woman is featured first along with a brief description of her connection to a Civil War soldier.  For the other women who are pictured in each part, a brief story is not provided, but blog readers are invited to add their own stories as comments to the blog post.  In some cases, the women or the soldiers have been previously featured on this blog and links are provided to those posts.

EXHIBIT DESCRIPTION

Portraits and Stories.  This portrait gallery is of women from the Lykens Valley and beyond who were influenced by or had an influence on the Civil War.  It includes mothers, wives and daughters of men of the Civil War generation.  A few of their stories have been briefly told here [in the exhibit].  As part of the Civil War Research Project, photographs and stories of these remarkable women are being collected and preserved for future generations.  Over time, much of this history has been lost because it has not been recorded and saved.  For the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, it has been a priority to collect, record and preserve this valuable part of our heritage.


 

lincolnabraham-wifemarytodd-450Mary [Todd] Lincoln

wife of

Abraham Lincoln

As the wife of the president, she was expected to be a model for women throughout the nation.  But her family was split in loyalty between North and South and her extravagant spending during the war resulted in much criticism of her and her habits.  She lost one young son to illness during the war and she worked to prevent her oldest son from enlisting as a Union soldier.  Two of her brothers died while fighting for the Confederacy.  When a brother-in-law. a Confederate General, was killed at Chickamauga, Tennessee, in 1863, she invited his widow, her sister Emilie, to live in the White House – because she had nowhere else to go.  But the greatest tragedy of all was the witnessing of the assassination of her husband at Ford’s Theatre in April 1865.


endersisaiaht-mothersusanfetterhoff-portrait-450

Susannah [Fetterhoff] Enders

mother of

Isaiah T. Enders


hartmanwilliam-wifeanna-portrait-450Anna M. [Stites] Hartman

wife of

William Hartman


hoffajohn-stepmothermary-portrait-450Mary [Fraunfelder] Hoffa

step-mother of

John Hoffa


wildermuthwilliam-wifemaryanna-portrait-450Mary Anna [Scheck] Wildermuth

wife of

William Wildermuth


hooverjosiah-wifecatherine-portrait-450Catherine [Schmeltz] Hoover

wife of

Josiah Hoover


minnichcyrus-dausarah-portrait-450Sarah Alice Minnich

daughter of

Cyrus Minnich


bowmanhenry-wiferebecca-portrait-451Rebecca E. [Frank] Bowman

wife of

Henry Bowman


hooverjosiah-daulawlillian-portrait-450Lillian [Wetzel] Hoover

daughter-in-law of

Josiah Hoover


hoffmanphilips-mothlaw-betsyrickert-portrait-450Betsy [Yerges] Rickert

mother-in-law of

Philip S. Hoffman


brownjoseph-daukatie-portrait-450Katie [Brown] Erdman

daughter of

Joseph Brown


All currently posted parts of this series may be accessed by clicking on Women&CivilWar.  Photographs are scaled for printing on 4 x 6 photo paper without further adjustment.

John Maguire – From Slate Picker to Mine Superintendent – Lived in Tremont

Posted By on November 11, 2016

maguirejohn-philainquirer-1912-03-13-001

The Philadelphia Inquirer of 13 March 1912 reported the death of John Maguire, a former mine superintendent:

John Maguire Claimed by Death

Special to the Inquirer

POTTSVILLE, Pennsylvania, 12 March 1912 — John Maguire, of this city, died last night.  He was a Civil War veteran, having served in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry and took part in the capture of Jefferson Davis.  He was a mine expert, having served in every capacity from breaker boy to the position of division superintendent for the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company.

Previously John Maguire had been located (as John Magnin) in the 1890 Veterans’ Census of Tremont, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania.  That census information is presented below:

maguirejohn-census1890v-001

As shown in the Pennsylvania Veterans’ Card File, as well as the 1890 Census, John Maguire served in two different regiments:

maguirejohn-pavetcardfile-001a

The above card from the Pennsylvania Archives confirms that a John Maguire served in the 39th Pennsylvania Infantry (Emergency of 1863) Company C.  Other records for that service show he was a Private, was mustered into service in late June 1863, and discharged at the end of the emergency in early August 1863.

maguirejohn-pavetcardfile-002

The above card from the Pennsylvania Archives confirms that a John Maguire served as a Private in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company C.  However, the card is incorrect in that he actually was in Company F.  At enrollment, he stated that he was 19 years old, born in England, stood 5 foot 7 inches tall, had a medium complexion, grey eyes, and was a miner.

maguirejohn-pensionindex-001

The Pension Index Card (above, from Fold3) for the John Maguire who served in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company F.  He applied for a pension on 8 December 1905, which he received.  And, the card confirms information in the obituary that he died on 11 March 1912.

Other records show that John Maguire emigrated to the United States in the early 1850s, and was married to Sarah Jane Lowthert who died on 5 June 1909 in Pottsville.  John appears in the 1910 Census for Pottsville as a widower and not working (presumably retired and collecting a Civil War pension).  His unmarried children are living with him.  He also reported in 1910 that he had served in the Union Army.

On John Maguire‘s death certificate, his parents were named as Thomas Maguire and Annie [Callow] Maguire, both of England.

Not much more about John Maguire is known at this time.  Any readers who can offer additional information can do so by adding a comment to this post.  Of particular interest is how he rose from a slate picker to a mine superintendent in the coal industry – and any other information on his activities in an around Tremont while he lived there.

Also, can anyone explain how he was involved in the capture of Jefferson Davis?