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Civil War Blog

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The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 69 – 77 and Path

Posted By on April 4, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features nine graves in the outer circle, fourth quadrant, beginning with photograph 69.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 69 through 77, followed by the path into the circle (photograph 78) and the path to the inner circle (photograph 79).  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#69 – Stone Broken at Ground – Unknown

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As with several other grave sites in the Soldier’s Circle, this stone is broken of at the ground – or may have been removed.  If the graves are in sequential order of death, the soldier buried here died between Sseptember 1895 and early June 1896.

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#70 – Unreadable

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Another badly weather-worn stone which is unreadable.  This soldier probably died in 1896.

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#71 – Unreadable

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Some of the wording on this grave marker may be readable upon closer examination.  The soldier buried here probably died in early 1896.

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#72 - Samuel Fryberger

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Samuel Fryberger was the subject of a post on this blog on 2 October 2011 entitled, “How Many Samuel Frybergers?“  He died on 6 June 1896.

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#73 – Charles Engle

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More information is sought on Charles M. Engle who died on 23 July 1897.  Can anyone identify his Civil War service by regiment and company?

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#74 - Elias Fox

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Elias Fox enrolled at Reading in the 5th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, as a Private, and was mustered into service in Harrisburg on 20 April 1861.  After completing his three months of service, he was discharged on 25 July 1861.  At the time he joined the infantry he said he was 36 years old.  Elias was born 21 October 1824 and died on 16 February 1898.  He applied for an invalid pension on 17 July 1890 while living in Shamokin.  After his death, his widow, Edith A. Fox, applied for and received pension benefits.

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#75 – Cyrus Zeigler

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Cyrus Zeigler (also found as Cyrus Ziegler) died on 12 May 1898.  There is a man of this same name who is recognized on the Lykens G.A.R. Monument, but it is not known if the one buried here is the same one.  A possibility exists that this is the man who served in the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, but that has not been confirmed.

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#76 – Joseph M. ——–

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This is a badly weathered grave stone that is very difficult to read.  The first name of the soldier appears to be Joseph and some other letters stand out, but the full name is unclear.  Death probably occurred after May 1898 and before November 1900.

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#77 – Unreadable

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Another unreadable and badly weathered stone, although some of the letters can probably be made out if the photograph is enlarged.

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This completes the outer circle.

#78 – Path into Second Circle

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#79 – Path into Second Circle

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.

Harrisburg Burning – Yet Again

Posted By on April 2, 2014

A third incident of arson in Harrisburg occurred in the early morning of 1 July 1865, the two previous incidents having occurred a few days prior and about two weeks prior.  This third incident resulted in the organization of citizens’ patrols.  The article that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer on 3 July 1865 also made note of the fact that soldiers were pouring into the city which was a major discharge point.  Among those regiments that were being discharged in Harrisburg and Camp Curtin at the time of the third fire were the 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry, the 190th Pennsylvania Infantry, and the 191st Pennsylvania Infantry.

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HARRISBURG.  Still Another Fire. Incendiarism.  The People Alarmed!  The Mayor Calls a Town Meeting.  Government Property Under Double Guard.  The Liquor Establishments Closed.  Citizens Patrol the Wards.  Pennsylvania Regiments Still Arriving.  Camp Curtin Filled with Soldiers.

Special Correspondence of the Inquirer.

Harrisburg, 1 July 1865 –

Still Another Fire – Incendiaries.

The fire fiends are still at work.  There is no doubt whatsoever that Harrisburg is infested with a few desperate characters, who have originated the fires that have occurred here within the last three weeks.  In the first fire of the series, they destroyed about thirty-five of the series, they destroyed about thirty-five thousand dollars’ worth of property in the very heart of the city.  The second attempt was made in the rear of the Brady House and the North Ward Girls’ Grammar School.  This square is composed of light frame tenements, and if the firemen had not arrived early the whole square might have been in a——- morning.  The third fire occurred early — morning in a stable in Raspberry Alley between Market and Chestnut Streets. On one side is the Jones House, on the other the Lochiel, to of the largest hotels in the city.

In close vicinity is the Dauphin Deposit Bank, Masonic Hall, Court House, Brant’s City Mills, and cetera.  The fiery element raged fiercely for a time, but through the gallant exertions of the firemen the flames were stayed, not, however, until after several buildings, the property of M. C. S. Legelbaum, were destroyed.

These fires have all occurred between the hours of two and four o’clock in the morning when it is the most difficult to arouse the people.  They are evidently designed to burn large and valuable districts.  Everybody is becoming alarmed.  The impression is gaining ground that it is an organized system to burn the place.

Although there is no paid fire department here the volunteer firemen have worked very efficiently,  A proposition has been before Councils to appoint a Fire Director for the city at a fixed salary, but the Fire Companies have strongly protested against it.  The war has brought here a very large number of itinerant and small traders and storekeepers, who for economy sake have occupied light frame buildings erected for temporary purposes.  Indeed the place is largely composed of this class of buildings.  This looks almost like inviting fires.  The wonder is that these conflagrations have not extended over more extended districts.  It is now urged that an ordinance be passed, prohibiting the erection of wooden buildings.  This would no doubt have a very good effect.

In view of the dangers surrounding the people a town meeting was called by the Mayor at the Court House this evening.  There was a large attendance.  The Mayor opened the meeting in a speech of some length, calling for immediate measures for the security of property. He laid the principal blame upon the bars and drinking saloons, and contended that they ought to be closed after a certain hour.  It was determined to close all drinking establishments at twelve o’clock.  The city was districted and patrols allotted to each district.

Captain Reichenbach, United States Quartermaster, at this point, addressed the meeting.  He said that he doubled the guards over Government property under his charge, and that this very evening he had set additional guards for several squared around his district.  He took occasion to obse3rve that, especially in localities where Government property was stored, the material of the building was very inflammable; in short, that they were mere “tinder boxes,” ready for firing at any moment.  He added, that although he did not know the feeling of the Mayor and Councils upon the subject, he would say that if any of his guards caught an individual under suspicious circumstances, they would hang him to the first lamp post.  This was greeted with cheers.

Our Patrol.

After the meeting an number of citizens reported to the Mayor for duty, and are on patrol to-night.  If an incendiary is caught is will certainly not be a convenient thing for him.  The recent heavy losses have excited the citizens to vengeance against these scoundrels, who will undoubtedly meet with summary punishment if detected.  The patrols are instructed to arrest all individuals out after twelve o’clock who cannot give a straight account of themselves.

The City Council also held a meeting this evening in an upper room of the Court House, where the citizens had assembled.  They passed a measure authorizing the appointment of an additional police force for secret night duty.

Camp Curtin is now full of soldiers, and more are arriving daily.  The streets present quite an excited appearance in the evening.  Hundreds of the old veterans are constantly tramping around, indulging in songs and other demonstrations.  Tradesmen are plying their vocations and making piles of money….

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For other blog posts on the Harrisburg fires of June 1865, see Harrisburg Burning.

News articles are from the on-line resources of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

 

Events of the World: March 1864

Posted By on March 31, 2014

March 1. Rebecca Lee Crumpler becomes the first black woman to receive a medical degree. Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened in 1873, she was able to perform such work without any formal training). In 1860, she was admitted to the New England Female Medical College. When she graduated in 1864, Crumpler was the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree.

Dr. Crumpler practiced in Boston for a short while before moving to Richmond, Virginia, after the Civil War ended in 1865. Richmond, she felt, would be “a proper field for real missionary work, and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women and children. During my stay there nearly every hour was improved in that sphere of labor. The last quarter of the year 1866, I was enabled . . . to have access each day to a very large number of the indigent, and others of different classes, in a population of over 30,000 colored.” She joined other black physicians caring for freed slaves who would otherwise have had no access to medical care, working with the Freedmen’s Bureau, and missionary and community groups, even though black physicians experienced intense racism working in the postwar South.  In 1883 she published a book based on notes she kept during her years of practice,  Book of Medical Discourses.

March 11.  The Great Sheffield Flood was a flood that devastated parts of Sheffield, England, on 11 March 1864, when the Dale Dyke Dam broke as its reservoir was 800px-Great_Sheffield_Floodbeing filled for the first time. Two hundred and thirty-eight people died and more than 600 houses were damaged or destroyed by the flood. The immediate cause was a crack in the embankment, but the source of the crack was never determined. The dam’s failure led to reforms in engineering practice, setting standards on specifics that needed to be met when constructing such large-scale structures. The dam was rebuilt in 1875.

March 14.  Composer Gioachino Rossini‘s Petite messe solennelle premiered in Paris. The mass was first performed at the dedication (14 March 1864) of the private chapel in the hôtel of Louise, comtesse de Pillet-Will, to whom Rossini dedicated this refined and elegant piece, which avoids the sentimental opulence of most contemporary liturgical works. 

 

March 19. Mireille is an 1864 opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Michel Carré after Frédéric Mistral’s poem Mireio. The vocal score is dedicated 358px-Caroline_Carvalho_as_Mireille_-_Lemoine_-_Gallica_v2to George V of Hanover. The opera premiered at the Théâtre Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1864; the first night was attended by Ivan Turgenev, who in a letter to Pauline Viardot, ridicules part of Act 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 29. Great Britain gives the Ionian Islands back to Greece. The British had ruled the islands since 1809, which had previously been under Venetian and then French control. 

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 60 – 68

Posted By on March 29, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features nine graves in the outer circle, fourth quadrant, beginning with photograph 60.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 60 through 68.  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#60 – S. F. Hower

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The name on this stone is clearly “S. F. Hower” and the regiment appears to be 191st Pennsylvania Infantry.  In the records, the closest match comes up as “Sebaltes F. Hower” but the given name is also found as Sylvester as well as variations on Sebaltes such as Sebaldis, Sebaldus, and Sebaltis.  The surname could also be Hoover.  One possible enlistment could be in the 35th Pennsylvania Infantry (6th Pennsylvania Reserves), Compoan A, as a Private, from July 1861 through June 1864.  This enrollment was in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, with mustering in at Washington, D.C.  The 191st Pennsylvania Infantry service was in Company F, as a Private, from 8 July 1861, with a notation that he was absent at muster out.  It is possible that two different men are confused here – but is that likely with such an unusual name?  Two women are found in the records as possible wives:  Mary E. Hower and Harriet Hower.

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#61 – Daniel Morgan

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Daniel Morgan was born in January 1833 in Wales and emigrated to America some time prior to the Civil War.  He died on either 18 or 19 September 1893 in Shamokin.  His service was in the 1st Pennsylvania Artillery (Light), Company or Battery I, as a Private.  His enrollment was at Troy, Pennsylvania, where he was also mustered into service on 5 October 1864, with service concluding at discharge on 1 July 1865.  After the war he worked as a miner in the Shamokin area.  His pension application was made on 26 July 1890 and about that time he is found as a resident at the National Soldiers’ Home in Dayton, Ohio.    His widow, Elizabeth Morgan, applied for his pension on 11 January 1898.

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#62 – Sunken Stone – Unreadable

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This stone needs to be carefully excavated and placed on a sturdy foundation.  It is currently too sunken in the ground to read.  It is possible that the name and regiment can be determined.  From the burial sequence in the circle, this veteran’s death occurred between mid-September 1893 and early July 1894.

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#63 – Adam Fisher

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Also partially sunken, this stone may have some readable information beyond the name of the veteran, Adam Fisher.  If this a correct match, then Adam was born on 23 March 1814 and died on 6 July 1894, but more information is needed to determine his Civil War service.

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#64 – Unreadable

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This is still another unreadable stone in the Soldiers’ Circle.  This veteran probably died in July 1884 since he buried between veterans show died on 6 July and 27 July.

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#65 – Nathan Kessler

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Nathan Kessler (or Kesler) was born about 1846 in Schuylkill County and died on either 27 or 28 July 1894.  During the Civil War, he enrolled at Pottsville, and was mustered into the service of the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private (also at Pottsville) where he gave his age as 19, and his occupation as carpenter.  His service in this regiment lasted from 12 March 1864 through 17 July 1865.  He applied for a disability pension on 13 June 1892, and following his death, the widow, Mary A. Kessler also applied on 15 January 1895.

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#66 – Stone Broken at Ground – Unknown

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#67 – Stone Broken at Ground – Unknown

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This stone is broken at the ground and thus it is impossible to tell who is buried here.  However, if the positioning of the burials is chronological, then this soldier died between July 1894 and September 1895.

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#68 - John L. Long

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John L. Long served in the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a 2nd Lieutenant, later promoted to 1st Lieutenant.  He was from the Halifax, Dauphin County area, and worked as a carpenter.  His enrollment was at Harrisburg and he was mustered into service on 2 September 1861 at Muddy Branch, Maryland.  His promotions were to Sergeant on 21 March 1862, from Sergeant to 1st Sergeant on 29 September 1864, to 2nd Lieutenant on 18 December 1864.  Regimental records also show that he re-enlisted at Dechard, Tennessee, on 5 January 1864.  Earlier service was as a Private and Corporal in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, from 26 April 1861 through 31 July 1861.  For this service in the 10th, he enrolled at Lykens Borough, was mustered in at Harrisburg, and gave his residence as Powell’s Valley, Dauphin County.  In 1870, John L. Long was living in Millersburg and still working as a carpenter.  Because of this residence, he should be named on the Millersburg Soldier Monument – but he is not.  Because he had residence at Lykens, he is one of the many veterans named on the Lykens G.A.R. Monument – as a member of that group.  John’s wife’s name was Nancy.  After his death, she applied for a pension, but it was not received.

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.

The Shamokin Soldiers’ Circle – Photographs 51 – 59

Posted By on March 27, 2014

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Today’s post on the Shamokin Cemetery’s Soldiers’ Circle features nine graves in the outer circle, third quadrant, beginning with photograph 51.  The photographs in this segment are numbered 51 through 59.  All of the stones in this section are sequenced in the order of the death of the veteran.  For each of the veterans, the best determination of the name is given and where possible some information about the military record.  Some errors may be noted where the information on the stone may not match other records.  Each grave photograph may be enlarged by clicking on it, and in some cases, readers may be able to identify or clarify some of the unknown information.  Comments can be added to this post or sent by e-mail to the Civil War Research Project.  The collected information on soldiers buried in the circle (including some military records, pension files, photographs, etc.) is available free-of-charge to veterans organizations, historical societies, and other non-profit groups.  Inquiries may be sent by e-mail or by regular mail, to the attention of Norman Gasbarro, P.O. Box 523, Gratz, PA  17030.

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#51 – Samuel P. Eisenhart

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Samuel P. Eisenhart served in the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Corporal and Sergeant, as indicated on his grave marker.  There are conflicting dates as to his muster in time (4 September 1861 or 13 January 1864), but he was mustered out of service on 16 July 1865.  His promotion to Sergeant occurred on 5 July 1865, nearly at the end of what may have been his second enlistment.  One military source states that he had re-enlisted at Dechard, Tennessee on 13 January 1864.  Originally he had enrolled in this company and regiment at Shamokin, was mustered in at Harrisburg, and declared that he was a miner residing in Shamokin.  Records clearly indicate that Samuel P. Eisenhart also served in Company K of the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, although this 3-month service is not noted on the grave marker.  Samuel submitted a pension application on 18 June 1888 and his widow followed suit on 22 March 1892 after his death.  Samuel P. Eisenhart was born about 1837 and died on 4 March 1892.

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#52 – ——–  —-erk

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This badly weathered stone has some partially readable information, but not enough to clearly identify the veteran who is buried here.  By the position in the circle, he died between early March 1892 and late January 1892.

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#53 – Peter ——–

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This badly weathered stone also has very little readable information.  The given name appears to be Peter.  By the position in the circle, he died between early March 1892 and late January 1892.

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#54 – Mort B. ——–

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The surname on this grave marker could be Ennah, and the first name is clearly Mort.  By the position in the circle, he died between early March 1892 and late January 1892.

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#55 – Elias F. Pifer

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Elias F. Pifer‘s birth year is given as 1837, but there is some evidence that he was actually born in January 1838.  Most records give the name as Elias F. Peifer.  The star-flag holder at this grave site is for the Mexican War, but that surely is in error as he would have been too young to serve in that war.  While there is another Elias Peifer who served in the 173rd Pennsylvania Infantry, this one probably served in the 52nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private.  At the time of enlistment Elias lived in Trevorton and was working as a laborer.  He gave his age as 23.  Two death dates are possibilities:  29 November 1892 and 2 December 1892.  It’s possible that the latter date is for the burial.

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#56 – Thomas Caldwell

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Thomas Caldwell, born about 1836, and died about 1892, although the death date on the stone appears to be 1882.  He first served in the 8th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private, from 22 April 1861 to 29 July 1861, giving his residence as Shamokin and occupation as laborer, and then re-enlisted in the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Sergeant, on 5 September 1861 through a discharge on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability on 9 October 1863.  He applied for a pension on 29 March 1880 and his widow, Anna B. Caldwell, applied in January 1892.  In 1890, Thomas Caldwell was living in Shamokin.

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#57 – Sunken in Ground – Unreadable

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The stone at this position is sunken in the ground and the visible portion is badly worn and unreadable.

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#58 – Joel Holshoe

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Joel Holshoe (or Joel Holtshoe) was born about 1830 and died about 1892.  He served in the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Private and Corporal from 4 September 1861 to re-enlistment at Dechard, Tennessee, on 13 January 1864, to discharge on 16 July 1865.  At enlistment in this regiment, he was a miner living in Shamokin.  His promotion to Corporal came on 1 November 1862. An earlier enlistment for 3 months was with the 8th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, also as a Private and Corporal.  He was mustered into that service on 22 April 1861 and was mustered out on 29 July 1861.  For this earlier enlistment, he gave his residence as Shamokin, but his occupation as laborer.  Following the Civil War, he applied for a pension on 9 May 1883, and after his death, his widow, Angeline Holshoe, applied.

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#59 – Samuel Tobias

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There are several persons with the name Samuel Tobias, so the records of this veteran could be confused with those of another.  It appears that this one was born either 19 November 1844 or 1845, and served in the 27th Pennsylvania Infantry (Emergency of 1863), Company C and/or Company I, as a Private, from 19 June 1863 through 30 August 1863.  He had enrolled at Tremont at age 18.  It also appears that this is the same Samuel Tobias who lived in Williams Township in 1870 and whose wife was Anna Elizabeth [Poticher] Tobias.  He died on 14 July 1893.

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For all posts in this series, click on ShamokinSoldCircle.