;

Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

Pennsylvania Railroad Offers Excursion from Lykens to K.K.K. Rally in Washington, 1926

| August 21, 2017

The Harrisburg Telegraph of 11 September 1926 advertised a special excursion rate of $6.00 by the Pennsylvania Railroad for anyone interested in attending the Ku Klux Klan “parade” to be held in Washington, D. C., on Monday, 13 September 1926.  The train was to leave Harrisburg at 2:00 A.M. on the 13th and return from […]

Isaac M. Spong – Buried in Lebanon, Not Malta!

| August 18, 2017

The name of Isaac M. Spong was first introduced to the Civil War Research Project by inclusion in the Klingerstown Bicentennial Album, which stated that he served in the 107th Pennsylvania Infantry and was wounded at Dabney’s Mills, Virginia – and that he was buried in the St. Luke’s Parish Cemetery, Malta, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania.  […]

Was Daniel Shive Murdered in 1893?

| August 16, 2017

During the Civil War, Daniel A. Shive served in the 210th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private, from 12 September 1864 through his honorable discharge on 30 May 1865.  He applied for a disability pension on 28 March 1891, which he received, but not long afterward, he was found dead along the railroad tracks […]

Some Clarifications on Franklin Speese

| August 14, 2017

In the initial Civil War Veterans’ List of this Project, there is a Benjamin Speece [or Speese] and a Franklin Speece [or Speese].  Recent research has proven that this is actually one person, who should be identified as Benjamin Franklin Speece (1828-1906) who served in the 184th Pennsylvania Infantry, and who is buried at Messiah […]

Samuel H. Sharron – 1890 Millersburg Veterans’ Census, But Not Civil War?

| August 11, 2017

Occasionally a post-Civil War veteran’s name appears in the 1890 Census along with regiment and dates of service. Usually though, the military service given begins late in 1865 and ends about three years later, which was the usual term of enlistment in a United States infantry regiment.  In the case of Samuel H. Sharron, who […]