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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

Events of the World: March 1864

| March 31, 2014

March 1. Rebecca Lee Crumpler becomes the first black woman to receive a medical degree. Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened […]

Events of the World: February 1864

| February 28, 2014

February 1. Danish-Prussian War (known as the Second Schleswig War) begins when 57,000 Austrian and Prussian troops cross the Eider River into Denmark. Like the First Schleswig War (1848–51), it was fought for control of the duchies of Holstein and Lauenburg due to the succession disputes concerning them when the Danish king died without an heir acceptable to the German Confederation. Decisive […]

Events of the World: January 1864

| January 31, 2014

January 11.  Charing Cross railway station, a central London railway terminus in the City of Westminster,opened. The original station building was built on the site of the Hungerford Market by the South Eastern Railway. The station was designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, with a single span wrought iron roof arching over the six platforms on its relatively cramped site. It is built on a brick arched […]

Victorian Home: Dining Room (Part 8)

| January 20, 2014

“The elegance with which a dinner is served is a matter that depends, of course, partly on the means, but still more upon the taste of the master and mistress of the house. It may be observed, in general, that there should always be flowers on the table, and as they form no item of […]

News of the World: Dec 1863

| December 30, 2013

December 1. First steam passenger railway opens in New Zealand. December 4. A storm causes major damage to the coast of the Netherlands December 8. Fire at the Church of the Company (Jesus Church of La Compana) in Santiago, Chile. It is the largest fire ever to have affected the city of Santiago. Between 2,000 and 3,000 people […]