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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

Free Tennessee Civil War Publications

Posted By on September 23, 2012

Tourism at Civil War sites in Tennessee should be helped by the publication of two pamphlets, both available free at information centers at entrances to the state and via “pdf” downloads on the web.

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Civil War Trails provides information on more than 1000 Civil War sites, many of which are accessible for the first time.  For Tennessee, the pamphlet is a large fold-out map of the state (on one side) and an historical overview of the state’s role in the war (on the other side).  By clicking on the picture below the overview will open in “pdf” format.

The “War in Middle and West Tennessee” is explained along with “Hood’s Campaign” [John Bell Hood], the “War in East Tennessee” [Ambrose E. Burnside and James Longstreet], a story on the “Great Raiders” [John Hunt Morgan, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and Joseph Wheeler], a interesting piece on “Tennessee USCT”  [United States Colored Troops], are all featured along with inset maps and a timeline of war events.  Connection to websites offering more information is facilitated in a section titled “The Civil War Revisited” which includes the statewide offices involved in the sesquicentennial as well as the various regional and local tourism centers and sites.  In most cases, a phone number is offered for those without web access.

The state and national sponsoring organizations include:  Tennessee Office of Tourist Development, Tennessee Wars Commission, Tennessee Historical Commission, National Park Service, and the Civil War Preservation Trust.  Note:  click on the name of any of the organization to go directly to the website.

The map of Tennessee Civil War sites can be opened in “pdf” format by clicking on the picture below.

Tennessee Civil War Trails Map.

Inset maps show detail that the full map cannot show and the photographs add to the attractive poster-like presentation.

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The second pamphlet, “A Path Divided:  Tennessee’s Civil War Heritage Trail,” was written by Dr. Wayne C. Moore of the Tennessee State Library and Archives.  A copy in “pdf” format will open by clicking on the cover picture below.

A Path Divided:  Tennessee’s Civil War Heritage Trail.

This 48 page pamphlet/booklet gives a narrative explaining the “Heritage Trail,” and then explains, in sections, the “Prologue to War,” and the areas of operation – “Invasion by River,” “Contest for Middle Tennessee,” “East Tennessee’s Mountain War”  and “Hood’s Tennessee Campaign.”  Following each of the areas of operation is an annotated list of the tourist sites association with that region.  For example, under the section on “Hood’s Tennessee Campaign,” the “Battle of Nashville Driving Tour” there is an address and phone number of the Metropolitan Historical Commission and a brief explanation of the battle as one of the “final large-scale engagements of the Civil War.”  The pamphlet then states where brochures can be obtained and that there is no charge for the brochures or the driving tour.

This pamphlet concludes with an “Epilogue”, a “Civil War Timeline,” and a 4-panel, fold-out map of “Tennessee’s Civil War Heritage Trail.”

Noticeably missing from the 48 pages of text are any “URL’s” where those interested in further information can easily access the organizations and sites mentioned.  However, the “URL” of the Tennessee Wars Commission who published the pamphlet is included on the inside cover and those wishing to find the various sites and organizations mentioned in the text can do their own Google searches to find the appropriate web sites.

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This post is part of a continuing effort on this blog to provide access to free resources pertaining to the Civil War.

For Lykens Valley soldiers who served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, much of their service time was spent in Tennessee.  Visiting the sites of their encampments, marches and battles is an excellent way to understand the difficulties they encountered in the war.  For those unable to travel to the actual sites, the free brochures and maps are helpful.

A map titled, “Fighting in Tennessee” can be found on pages 100-101 of Yankee Cavalrymen: Through the Civil War with the Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, by John W. Rowell, published in 1971 by the University of Tennessee Press at Knoxville.  The book is based in great part on the diary of William Thomas of Lykens Borough, Dauphin County.  See:  Where is the Diary of William Thomas?

 

 


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