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Civil War Blog

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More Millersburg Area Portraits Found (Part 1)

Posted By on April 16, 2012

Recently, some portraits were located in Millersburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania histories and entered into the digital files of the Civil War Research Project:  Included in this post are portraits of Simon S. Bowman; James L. Seebold,’s son,  Frank P. Seebold; and Dr. John F. Bowman.

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Simon Sallade Bowman (1842-1916)

Simon S. Bowman served in the 37th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G (Emergency Militia Force of 1863), as a Private.  He joined the company on 1 July 1863 and was discharged on 4 August 1863 when the emergency was over.  He also served with the Regular Army as a Paymaster Clerk from 1865 to 1866 as is noted on the 1890 Census (see below).

Click on document to enlarge.

No pension record for Simon Bowman has yet been located and it is not known at this time whether he applied.  His actual Civil War service was probably too short to qualify.

His name appears on the Millersburg Soldier Monument as “S. S. Bowman.”

Simon S. Bowman married Anne P. “Anna” Jackson in 1866 and their known children were:   Maj. Sumner Sallade Bowman (born about 1867); Edmund B. Bowman (about 1868); Irene A. Bowman (about 1871); Nellie M. Bowman (about 1874); Hannah Bowman (about 1877); James Donald Bowman (about 1880) and Robert Herr Bowman (about 1889).

Simon S. Bowman was an attorney in Millersburg as is noted on the census returns of 1870, 1880, 1900 and 1910.  In 1860, prior to serving in the Civil War, he indicated he was a student at a seminary.

Simon S. Bowman is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg.

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James L. Seehold (1840-1927)

Frank P. Seebold was the son of James L. Seebold, the Civil War veteran who served in the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a 2nd Lieutenant, from 9 September 1861 to his discharge on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability on 10 December 1864.  James L. Seebold was married to Lydia L. Bowman.   A portrait of James L. Seebold has not yet been located.

James L. Seebold is named on the Millersburg Soldier Monument as “J. L. Seebold.”  His grave is located in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg.

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Dr. John F. Bowman (1841-1914)

John F. Bowman was an older brother of Simon Sallade Bowman (see above).  He was previously identified as a Civil War veteran who was also a Lykens Valley area physician [see:  Civil War Medicine – Re-enactors].   John F. Bowman served in the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E (Emergency Militia of 1862), as a Private.

John F. Bowman‘s name can be found on the Millersburg Soldier Monument as “J. F. Bowman.”

According to the Directory of Deceased American Physicians, John F. Bowman was born in Elizabethvile, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, on 2 January 1841, and died in Millersburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, 15 January 1914.  He was an “Allopathic Specialist” who practiced in both Millersburg and Lykens Township.  He graduated from the Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, in 1865.

All census returns from 1860 through 1910 indicate his residence as Millersburg.  In 1860, before he entered military service, he worked as a clerk for his father, John Jefferson Bowman, who was a Millersburg merchant.  John’s mother was Margaret [Sallada] Bowman.  Dr. Bowman married Georgiana Gladdin who was born around 1846 and had two known children:  Frederick G. Bowman (born around 1869) and Ralph F. Bowman (born around 1872).  As of 1910, Dr. Bowman was “retired.”

No pension record has been located for John F. Bowman and he probably didn’t apply due to the short term of his service which was only about one month from September 1862 to October 1962.

Dr. John F. Bowman is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in Millersburg.

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The Pension Index Card for James L. Seebold is from Ancestry.com.

This post will continue tomorrow.


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