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Civil War Blog

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2012 Additions to Civil War Veterans List – G to J

Posted By on April 24, 2012

Veterans of the Civil War identified as having some connection to the Lykens Valley area and included in the Civil War Research Project was updated 19 April 2012.  In a series of post beginning last Friday and continuing intermittently for seven posts until concluding at the end of this month, a brief sketch of each of the newly added names will be presented along with a hyperlink to a specific post of list of posts where the name appears in the blog.

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G

John W. Gaiton (1821-xxxx) was drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  He was from Columbia County and he was discharged on a Surgeon’s certificate of Disability after ten days.

Barnabas Ganther (1837-1863), an immigrant from Ireland, died at Bridgeport, Alabama, 18 October 1863, while serving with the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He had enrolled at Scranton and indicated that his residence was Dauphin County and his occupation was wagon maker.  He had previously served in the 15th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private.

Noah K. Gantz (1845-1911) married Amanda Henry.  He is buried at Friedensaal Lutheran Church Cemetery, Seven Villages, York County.  He was a laborer who resided in York County where he had been born when he enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.

Adam F. Geesey (1841-1921) served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  He was a clerk from York County.  Records indicate that he also was credited for service in an unassigned regiment of volunteers.  Adam married Barbara Ellen Hovis and is buried in Union Cemetery Dallastown, York County.

Edwin D. Geesey (1836-1900), a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G and the 166th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, serving in both as a Private.  He was from York County and was a laborer.  Edwin was the first cousin of Franklin Geesey, also a Civil War soldier.  Edwin’s wife was Mary Ann Felty.  After the war, he moved to Maryland and applied for his pension from there.  He is buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery. Woodsboro, Frederick County, Maryland.

Franklin Geesey (1825-1905), the first cousin of Edwin D. Geesey, was also a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, and served as a Private.  He was a laborer from York County and he married Juliann Hartman.  Franklin also went by the name “Frederick Geesey.”

George W. Geesey (1844-1927) is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County. He joined the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  There is a second person with this name who was from another part of Pennsylvania and their records could be co-mingled.

George Geiger (18xx-xxxx) was found in the Halifax veterans’ list.  He is buried in the Halifax United Methodist Church Cemetery, Halifax, Dauphin County.  It s possible that this veteran served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.

J. W. Geiger (18xx-xxxx) is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, and is named as a Civil War veteran although a specific regiment has not yet been connected with him.

Henry Giffin (1837-1915) was a member of the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, in which he served as a Private.  It is possible that he also served in the 203rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, but this has not been confirmed.  His wife’s name was Mary A.

Mahlon Giffen (18xx-1883) is named on the Millersburg Civil War Memorial and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg.  Research is on-going to determine his specific service.

Thomas Gingles (1839-1902) was drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private but was discharged the same day on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.  He was from Columbia County and had a wife named Alice.

Leo Gladfelter (1847-xxxx), a farmer from York County, served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  His wife’s name was Margaret.

John J. Goe (18xx-xxxx) enrolled in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private, while at a recruitment station in Scranton, but the records indicate he never joined the company.

Henry Melvin Gohn (1837-1926) was from Chanceford, York County.  He is buried at Windsor Cemetery, Windsor, York County.  He was a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, at the rank of Private.  Three wives are associated with Henry:  Lydia Jane Arnold, Susan Loucks Arnold, and Martha Adams.  There is another person named Henry Gohn who was born about 1842 and whose records might be co-mingled.

Samuel Grahn (1835-xxxx) could be Samuel Green.  He enrolled at Lykens Borough, Dauphin County, and indicated that he was a painter from Duncan’s Island, Dauphin County.  He served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  Several persons who may fit the description of this veteran are listed as “mulatto” in the census.

Edward Gratz Jr. (1842-xxxx) was a grandson of Simon Gratz, the founder of Gratz Borough.  He was a member of the 121st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company H, serving as 1st Lieutenant.  He resigned from this regiment to become Additional Paymaster of U.S. Volunteers.  In 1863, he was promoted to Full Major.  Edward married Frances Donaldson.

Lewis J. Gratz (1841-xxxx) is believed to be the same person as Louis A. Gratz who was previously included in the veterans’ list.  He was an immigrant at about the time of the Civil War and had no known connection to the Gratz family of Philadelphia.

William Gratz (1831-1893) was a Private and Sergeant in the 124th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F.  He was wounded at Antietam, Maryland, 17 September 1862, and discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability on 12 February 1863.  William was born in Germany and had no known connection to the Gratz family of Philadelphia. His wife’s name was Louisa or “Eliza.”

William Gratz (1835-1864) was from the Pittsburgh, Allegheny County area and probably not directly connected to the Gratz family of Philadelphia.  He served in the 74th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  He was not on the muster out roll and probably died in the war.  His mother, Eva Gratz, applied for a pension based on his service.

Charles H. Green (1843-xxxx) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  He was born in Eagle Hill, Schuylkill County, worked as a miner and resided in Dauphin County at the time of his enrollment.

David McMurtie Gregg (1833-1916) was a cousin of Gov. Andrew Curtin.  He served with the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry as a Colonel before being promoted to Brigadier General.  He was later on the U.S. Volunteers General Staff.  In 1864, he was promoted to Brevet Major General. Gen. Gregg is buried in Charles Baber Cemetery, Reading, Berks County.

John Irwin Gregg (1826-1892) was a nephew of Gov. Andrew Curtin.  He served in the 3rd U.S. Cavalry as a Captain, in the 34th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Captain, and with the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry, as a Colonel.  In 1865, he was promoted to Brevet Major General.  In 1864, he was wounded at Deep Bottom, Virginia.  Gen. Gregg is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

John J. Greiner (1839-1898) served in the 172nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, and the 210th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He is buried in Fetterhoff’s Cemetery, Halifax, Dauphin County.

Jacob Griffiths (1845-1898) was a member of Thompson’s Battery Light Artillery as well as the 123rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I.  In both he served as a Private.  On the night of the Lincoln assassination, he was one of the soldiers who it is believed carried Lincoln from the theatre to the Petersen House.  In the military records, his first name might be found as “Jabez,” “Jabey,” or “Jake.”  He married Elizabeth Mallen (perhaps the same person as Minerva, or perhaps a second wife’s name).  He is buried in Richland Cemetery, Richland, Lebanon County.

Thomas D. Griffiths (1838-xxxx) was born in Edinburg, Scotland.  His occupation was stewart and he was a resident of Dauphin County.  In addition to serving in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a 1st Sergeant, he later received promotions to 2nd Lieutenant before he resigned in 1864.  There is also the same possibility that he served in the 5th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, and another regiment.

Aaron Galusha Grow (1822-1907) was the U.S. Congressman from the 14th Congressional District which included Harrisburg and Gratz Borough in Dauphin County and from 1861-1863, he was the Speaker of the House.  He served in the U.S. Congress as a Democrat from 1853-1857 and switched parties, then serving as a Republican from 1857-1863.  He was defeated for re-election by a Democrat.  He is buried in Harford Cemetery, Harford, Susquehanna County. He is most often found in the records as Galusha A. Grow.  There is no record of service in the military although he did register for the draft in 1863.

Joshua Greenawalt (1828-xxxx, who lived in Branch Township, Schuylkill County, in 1850, was a Wagoner and a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  At the time of his enlistment, he was a teamster and living in Llewellyn, Schuylkill County.  At the time of an earlier service in the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private, he was a laborer living in Llewellen, Schuylkill County.

Charles Goetz (1823-xxxx) served for a time in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was mustered into service at Chambersburg, Frnklin County.  He was reported “deserted” at Gettysburg, Adams County.  The name is also spelled “Goertz” in the records.

Joel Gottshall (1843-1864) was taken prisoner and died of disease at Salisbury, North Carolina, date unknown.  He was a farmer from Schuylkill County who had enrolled at Pottsville in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  There is also a person named “Peter F. Gottshall” in the records and the two may be the same person.


H

Frederick A. Haines (1826-1917), who is buried in the Belknap Cemetery, Belknap, Armstrong County, was drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private, but was discharged the same day on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.  He married late in life (1894) to Mary Rebecca McMillan.

Levi W. Hake (1831-1908) served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  He was York County.  Levi married twice:  Mary Jane Morrison and Mary “Polly” Tome.  He is buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Manchester Township, York County.

Charles W. Hamilton (18xx-xxxx) was a member of the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company G.  The name was suggested by a family member for inclusion in the veterans’ list.

William D. Hamilton (18xx-xxxx) also was a member of the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company G.  The name was suggested by a family member for inclusion in the veterans’ list.

Elisha Atherton Hancock (1839-1906) was from Luzerne County and was a Captain in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, where he had been promoted from 1st Lieutenant of Company H.  He was commissioned as Major on 11 January 1865 and wounded at Averysboro, North Carolina, 16 March 1865.  Elisha married Julia A. Reichard and also married a Simonton.  He is buried at Hollenback Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County. At the time of his death he was a grain merchant in Philadelphia.

Henry Harris (1842-xxxx), of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, was a Private who reportedly deserted at Springfield, Tennessee.  When he joined the regiment, he indicated his occupation was sailor and his residence was Dauphin County.

Jacob Harris (18xx-xxxx) is listed as a deserter from the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He was a Private and the desertion date is given as 26 May 1864.

Martin Harris (1833-1886) can also be found in the records as “Martin Horace.”  He is listed in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County veteran’s list.  It is possible that his service was in the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry and/or the 198th Pennsylvania Infantry, but this has not been confirmed.  He married Mary Wert.

Jeremiah S. Hartman (1845-1907) married Susan Cook.  He was a farmer from York County who, after the Civil War moved to Colorado and possibly also to Nebraska.  His service was in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.

John G. Hartman (1835-1905), a Private in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, later transferred to company K.  According to the Pennsylvania Archives, there is a person of this name who is buried in Buffalo Township Cemetery, Saville Township, Perry County, who died in 1893 and who served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, but a Pension Index Card notes that a woman named Mary applied for a widow’s pension in 1893.  Additional research is necessary to resolve this conflict.

John Frederick Hartranft (1830-1889) was a Civil War General from Pottstown, Montgomery County, who later became the 17th Governor of Pennsylvania.  He served with the 4th Pennsylvania Infantry and the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry at various ranks and with promotions ending with Brevet Major General, 25 March 1865.  During the trail of the conspirators in the Lincoln assassination, he became involved in a controversy involving Mary Surratt.  Gen. Hartranft married Sallie Douglas Sebring and is buried at Montgomery Cemetery, Norristown, Montgomery County.

William Hartman (18xx-1876) was found in the Oak Hill Cemetery list (Millersburg, Dauphin County) as a Civil War veteran.  Additional information is sought on his military record.

John A. Hauck (1842-xxxx) served with the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a 1st Sergeant and later promoted to 1st Lieutenant.

David Hebbel (1833-xxxx) joined the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, as a Private.  He married Jeanette Thompson.  His mother, Roseanna Hatchett, was from Halifax, Dauphin County.  After the war he moved to Michigan.

James B. Heim (1848-xxxx) was born in Upper Mahanoy Township, Northumberland County, and resided in Washington Township, Northumberland County, at the time of his enlistment in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.

John Heine (1816-xxxx) was born in Germany and was a mason living in Dauphin County at the time he joined the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He was reported sick in the hospital at Louisville, Kentucky, date unknown, and also as deserted, 18 April 1864.

Elias Heiney (1846-xxxx), a Private in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, was a laborer who was born in Dauphin County. There was an “Eli Heiney” who was in Company F from Lancaster County, who was listed as a deserter, not believed to be the same person.

Jacob Heiser (1843-1912) as also found as “Heister” and “Heyser.”  He served in the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, as a Private, and also possibly the 202nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Private.  He married a woman named Deanna or Diana.  Jacob was from Eldred, Schuylkill County.

John Heissler (1826-1862) was killed in action at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run, 29 August 1862, while serving with the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal.

John A. Hennessy (1834-1877) ended the war with the rank of Brevet Brigadier General.  He was from Ashland, Schuylkill County, and served in the 52nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K and a Headquarters.  He was the subject of an article in the Citizen Standard, 25, June 1993, “Ashland Man Raised Flag.”

Ephraim Henninger (1844-1918), a Private in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, was born in York County and resided in York County at the time he joined the regiment.  He was a miner.  In 1850, he lived in Wiconisco Township, Dauphin County.  His first service was with the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company K, as a Private.  He married Mary Warwick and is buried in Shamokin Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County.

Joseph R. Henninger (1846-xxxx) enrolled in the 11th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B, as a Private at Pine Creek, Lycoming County and was mustered into service at Williamsport, Lycoming County.  In 1850 he lived in Wiconisco Township, Dauphin County.  His wife’s name was Clara V.

Joshia Henninger (18xx-xxxx) is probably “Josiah Henninger” who is already in the veterans’ list.  “Joshia” is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, as a Civil War veteran.

Andrew Guise Hensel (1831-1908) is buried at Calvary Cemetery, Wiconisco, Dauphin County.  The stone is broken.  The G.A.R. star-flag holder marks his grave, which was pictured in a prior post.  He was married to Catherine Workman.  Additional research is needed to identify his military service.

Samuel H. Hepler (1838-1897) served in the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, as a Private.  His wife’s name was Margaret.  As noted in the Tower City veterans’ list, there is a person of this name who is buried in a Tower City (Schuylkill County) area cemetery, but it is not known if it is the same one.

John Henry Herring (1841-1912) was a resident of Llewellyn, Schuylkill County, who served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a 1st Lieutenant.  He married Alice J. Lehman.  After the war he moved to Texas and California.

Jacob Hess (1841-1890) is buried at Sweitzer’s Memorial Cemetery, Berrysburg, Dauphin County, with a G.A.R. marker at his grave.  No regiment has been identified for his service.

John W. Hess (1843-xxxx) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  Because of the number of individuals who had this same name and who served in the Civil War, it is difficult to separate them in the records. See prior post:  Who is John Hess?

William James Hesser (1841-1911) was from Minersville, Schuylkill County, and was a Private in the 5th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, and a Corporal in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He had a wife named Mary A. and he is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Norristown, Montgomery County.

Thomas Hicks (1836-xxxx) joined the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private at Madisonville, Tennessee, on 29 February 1864.  Not much is known about his background or life after the war.

Isaac Hildebrand (1841-1931) was a teacher from York County.  He was a Private in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G.  Isaac married Diana Walker.  He is buried in the Jefferson United Brethren Cemetery, Jefferson Township, York County.

George H. Hinkle (1834-xxxx) was in the 136th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private, and the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private. during his service in the cavalry, he was badly injured by a horse falling on him.  His residence was Dauphin County and by trade, he was a shoemaker.  There is another person from the Lykens Valley area of a similar name and their records may be co-mingled.

George W. Hinkle (1843-xxxx) is buried at Church of the Brethren Cemetery, Upper Paxton Township, Dauphin County. There is a G.A.R. marker at his grave, but no regiment is specified on his stone.  It is possible this George Hinkle is the one who served with the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Private and/or the 26th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company K, as a Private.  There is another person from the Lykens Valley area of a similar name and their records may be co-mingled.

Jacob Heininger (1846-1926) was a York County laborer who enlisted in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, at the rank of Private.  He married Rachel Ann Devoe.  After the war he moved to Illinois.  It’s possible the name could be spelled “Henninger.”

John Hoehm (1833-1892) was a Dauphin County musician who was born in Germany and served with the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  He is buried at Hollenback Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County.

Philip Hoffa (18xx-xxxx) was from the family of Thomas Jefferson “T.J.” Tobias and is believed to be a Civil War veteran but a specific regiment has not been located.

George Hoffman Jr. (1826-1856) was murdered while at a military encampment in Gratz, Dauphin County, in 1856. While this event occurred prior to the Civil War, the annual encampments played an important role in the training of young men for their role in the militia.  The murder, which took place near the Laudenslager Hotel on Market Street in Gratz Borough, is described on page 180 of A Comprehensive History of the Town of Gratz Pennsylvania.

Jacob Hoke (1842-1904) is buried at the Maple Grove Cemetery, Elizabethville, Dauphin County.  No military record has yet been found, but Jacob did register for the draft in 1863.  His wife’s name was Catherine.

Jonathan Hoke (1841-1862) died at Jeffersonville, Indiana, 2 June 1862, while serving with the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private. He had enrolled at Berrysburg, Dauphin County, and his occupation was shoemaker.  His mother’s name was Susannah.

John C. Holmes (1840-xxxx) has a confused record of service in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He was a mason from Dauphin County who enrolled at Berrysburg, Dauphin County.  Some records indicate he held the rank of Captain while others indicate he was a Sergeant.  There is a record indicating that he was reduced in ranks, date unknown.  Also, a card notes a desertion from a Louisville, Kentucky hospital.

Daniel Hoober (1842-xxxx) served in the 10th Pennsylvanai Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  He was a miner from Lykens Borough, Dauphin County.  There is also a record, possibly for the same person, of service as a Bugler and Trumpeteer in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  This could also be “Daniel Hoover” and/or the records of two or more persons could be co-mingled.

Jonathan Hoober (1847-xxxx) is buried at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County.  He was married to Ida DeLong.  His service was in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  Enrollment records indicate he was a laborer who was born in Dauphin County but residing in Dover, York County.  This could be “Jonathan Hoover” and/or the records of two or more persons of the the same name could be co-mingled.

Josiah Edmond Hoover (1828-1923) is buried at St. Peter (Hoffman’s) Cemetery, Lykens Township, Dauphin County.It is possible that he was a Civil War veteran but no specific regiment has yet been associated with him.  He was married to Catherine Schmeltz.

Henry Hosan (1843-xxxx) married Lydia Ann Shelly.  There are several possible regiments of service for this individual including the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia of 1863), Company C, the 143rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, and the 127th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  No confirmation has been located.

John Hughes (18xx-xxxx) was a lawyer in Pottsville, Schuylkill County.  He was identified in the Citizen Standard article of 25 June 1993, “Some Locals Served with Confederates,” but no specific rebel regiment was named.

William Hunt (18xx-xxxx) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  Nothing further is known about him at this time.

Edward Harner (1839-1864) was a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, who was killed in action, probably in 1864.  He was a resident of Sacramento, Schuylkill County, and a laborer at the time of his enrollment.His mother’s name was elizabeth.

Henry Hoyer (1840-1890) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private and was discharged, date unknown, on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability.  He enrolled at Hubley Township, Schuylkill County, declaring residence there and an occupation of blacksmith. His wife’s name was Susan.

William G. Herb (1838-1879), a resident of Hubley Township, Schuylkill County, enrolled at Llewellyn, Schuylkill County, in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was a laborer and his mother was Catherine Herb.  His brother, Andrew Herb, was also a soldier in the war. There is a William Herb buried in St Joseph’s Church Cemetery, Pike Township, Berks County, and it possibly is the one from Hubley Township who served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, but there are several persons of this name and their records could be co-mingled.

Joel Hauenstine (1844-1919) is buried in Brock’s cemetery, Ashland, Schuylkill County.  One record indicates that he deserted from a Philadelphia hospital while a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A. and another record indicates that he officially was mustered out.  At the time of his enrollment in Pottsville, he stated he was born in Northumberland County and was working as a carpenter. Joel was married to a woman named Julia and the surname is found also with spellings of “Hannenstein” and “Howenstine.”

Jacob Henry (1845-1864) was killed at Wilderness, Virginia, 6 May 1864, while serving with the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was a wheelwright from Schuylkill County who had enrolled at Pottsville.

Isaac Houtz (1838-1864) died on 12 June 1864 from wounds received in battle while serving in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Companies A and K, as a Private  For a time, his company was assigned to the 79th New York Infantry, Company F.  His mother’s name was Elizabeth.

Martin Horning (1844-1913) was a substitute who served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, at the rank of Private. He also served in the 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private, and during this service was captured at Sulphur Springs, Virgina, 12 Ocotber 1863.  Records indicate his wife’s name was Hannah or Catherine (or possibly two different wives).  He is buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Holidaysburg, Blair County.  The surname is also found as “Harning.”

John Henry (1847-1911) is also found as “John Hervy” and “John Hervey.”  He enlisted at Pottsville in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was a laborer residing in Schuylkill County at the time of his enlistment.

Henry Hauenstein (1844-xxxx) joined the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private and was wounded on 30 July 1864.  He was absent at muster out. An 1880 census schedule names a Henry Hauenstein who was a deaf mute as a result of a wound in the army, possibly the same person. Henry was born in Northumberland County and was a farmer at the time of his enrollment.  The surname is found in the records as “Havlenstine,” “Habenstine” and Havenstine” in addition to other variations.

Benjamin Hartzog (1843-xxxx), a resident of Donaldson, Schuylkill County,was a laborer who enlisted in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  After the war he became a member of the Regular Army.  Later in life he resided in a veterans’ home and used the alias “Walter Davis.”

Jonathan Hearther (1844-1907) was wounded in action on 13 May 1864 at Spottsylvania Court House, Virginia.  He served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  The 1890 Veterans’ Census indicates that he was an amputee “above the knee” but it is not known at this time whether the amputation was a result of the wound received during the war.  His discharge date in 1865 was the date for the formal muster out of his company. Jonathan, whose name is also found as “Hearter,” “Haertter,” “Harter,” and “Hartler,” married Mary Edith Berkheimer but later was separated from her.  He is buried in North Cedar Hill Cemetery, Frankfort, Philadelphia.

I

Edwin Inness (1844-xxxx) was a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G.  He served as a Private.  At his enlistment he was a resident of York County and was a laborer.  It’s possible he was an immigrant.

 

J

Harrison James (18xx-xxxx) was identified as a Confederate in the Citizen Standard article of 25 June 1993, “Some Locals Served with Confederacy.”  His family was from Pottsville and Minersville in Schuylkill County and Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County, and the record shows he served in the 8th Kentucky Cavalry (Confederate). However, he had four brothers who served in the Union Army.

Joseph Jeneskey (1840-xxxx) was a miner and a resident of Lykens Borough, Dauphin County, when he enlisted in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  In the 1890 Veterans’ census, a Joseph Jenesky, who was living in Shamokin, Northumberland County, indicated service also in the 19th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company D, as a Private.

Patrick Joice (1834-xxxx) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal.  He enrolled at Tremont, Schuylkill County, but indicated that his residence was Pittsburgh, Allegheny County.

William Alonzo Junk (1836-1896) joined the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company A, as a Private.  He was a resident of Dauphin County and was a farmer.  During his service he transferred to Company K.  William married Cornelia V. DeKalb.

Adam Jury (1814-1865) died at Salisbury Prison, North Carolina, 4 Jan 1865.  He first served in the 35th Pennsylvania Infantry (6th Pennsylvania Reserves) and later joined the 191st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  His widow’s name was Sarah.

George Washington Jury (1839-1918) married Annie Gish and moved to Kansas after the war.  His service was in the 47th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, as a Private.

John Frederick Jury (1826-1906) is buried in Congress Hill Cemetery, Girard Township, Clearfield County.  His wife was Elizabeth Graffius.  He has been identified as a Civil War veteran with Lykens Valley area connections, but those connections as well as his military service record have not yet been located.

John S. Jury (1831-1910) was previously discussed on this blog.  See Lt. John S. Jury.

David Jones (1844-xxxx) was a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He was a Private.  The enrollment records state he was born in Philadelphia and was employed as a porter.  He was not found on the muster out rolls.

Gabriel Juda (1824-xxxx) mustered in at Reading, Berks County, to the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, at the rank of Private.  He was a substitute.

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The list will continue tomorrow, with surnames beginning with K through O.


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