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Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

2012 Additions to Civil War Veterans List – A to C

Posted By on April 20, 2012

Veterans of the Civil War identified as having some connection to the Lykens Valley area and included in the Civil War Research Project was updated 19 April 2012.  In a series of post beginning today and continuing intermittently for eight posts until concluding at the end of this month, a brief sketch of each of the newly added names will be presented along with a hyperlink to a specific post of list of posts where the name appears in the blog.

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A

William Adams (1794-1871) is buried in Sweitzer’s Memorial Cemetery in Berrysburg, Dauphin County.  This is believed to be a different William Adams than the one in the Tower City list.  Although there is a G.A.R. marker at his gravesite, the year of birth suggests that he was too old to be a Civil War veteran.  No military service record has been located.

George W. Allison (1842-1889) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, and claimed residence in Berks County and birth in York County.  He is buried in Salem Union Cemetery, Jacobus, York County.  His wife’s name was Carolina.

James W. Allison, brother of George W. Allison, also served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  He was born in York County and resided there at the time of enlistment.  He is buried in St. Peter’s Cemetery, Springfield Township, York County.  It is possible that he died of either an injury received in the war or a disease contracted during the war.

George Anthony was a member of the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G.  Born in Germany, he was a resident of York County at the time of enlistment.

Enos R. Artman (1838-1912) served in the 213th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Captain and as a Major.  He als0 served in the 104th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, as a Lieutenant.He was married to Deborah L. Beaver and Carolyn Foedre.  Maj. Artman is buried in the West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cyndwyd, Pennsylvania.

Jonas Artz (1833-1917) was suggested by a family member for inclusion as a possible veteran of the Civil War but no military connection has been located.  He was married to Elizabeth Buffington.

B

Martin Bachman (1818-1900) is believed to be the same person who was found in the Dalmatia veterans list and who is buried in Trinity Church Cemetery, Dalmatia. Two persons of this name have been found in the military records, one who served in the Independent Battery I, Light Artillery as a 1st Lieutenant, and the other in the 79th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E, as a Sergeant.  It is possible that they are the same person since the dates of service are consecutive, not concurrent.  Possible wives of a person named Martin Bachman are Sarah Elizabeth and Katie Peiffer.

Solomon Bachman (18xx-xxxx).  A person of this name is said to be buried in the Zion Cemetery, Hickory Corners, Northumberland County, with possible service in the 41st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I as a Private.  More information is needed.

Romeo R. Bacon (1837-xxxx) was commissioned a 1st Lieutenant in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, but resigned on 1 February 1863.  It is believed that he was a resident of Philadelphia.

Adam Badeau (1831-1894) was the secretary and historian of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and a close friend and tutor of Edwin Booth who supposedly intervened after the Lincoln assassination to keep Edwin Booth out of jail.  As a member of Gen. Grant’s staff, he was well-known to all who served under Grant.

Augustus Bademan (1826-xxxx) was suggested for inclusion through the Dalmatia veterans list but his military record has not yet been located.  He was married to women named Mary and Rebecca.  The spelling of his surname could be “Badman” or “Bateman.”

David Ballow (1842-xxxx) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Sergeant.  His enrollment was at Gratz Borough and he gave his residence as Tremont, Schuylkill County. It is possible that this is the same person as David Bellon.

Joseph K. Barnes (1817-1883) was from Pennsylvania and was the Surgeon General of the United States from 1864-1883.  He was married to Mary Fauntleroy and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

Frank H. Barnhart (1840-1896) served in the 6th Pennsylvania Infantry and the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A where he rose in rank from Private to Captain.  After the war he served in the Regular Army.  He married Catherine P. Sessions and is buried in the Reformed Church Cemetery, Branch Township, Schuylkill County.

William H. Baugher (1839-1915) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Bompany B, as a 1st Lieutenant.  He was a carpenter from Cumberland County after the war lived in Maryland, where he applied for his pension.

Charles Beach (1842-1864) was killed at Petersburg, Virginia, while serving in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was from Schuylkill County and had enlisted at Pottsville.  He is buried in Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Virginia.

James A. Beaver (1837-1914), Governor of Pennsylvania from 1887-1891, had served with several Pennsylvania regiments including the 148th Pennsylvania Infantry, the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry, and the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry.  His final rank was Brevet Brigadier General.  He was married to Mary McAllister. He was also an amputee as a result of a Civil War wound.  He is buried in Union Cemetery, Bellefonte, Centre County.

BEISEL FAMILY:  It has been suggested that the following members of this family may have had some connection to the Lykens Valley area.  More research is needed to establish the connection. 

Aaron E. Beisel (1839-1880) was a Wagoner who served with the 41st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company E and lost an arm during the war.  He was probably from Northampton County, where he is buried in the Schoenck Moravian Cemetery, Bushkill Township.

Alphonso B. Beisel (1838-1909) was believed to be from Carlisle and served in the 130th Pennsylvania Infantry as a Corporal.  His wife was Sarah R. McCommon.

Franklin P. Beisel (1846-1930) served with the 47th Pennsylvania Infantry and the 7th Pennsylvania Infantry, was married to someone named Sarah, and is buried in Union West End Cemetery, Allentown, Lehigh County.

Fred V. Beisel (18xx-xxxx)  served in the 63rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, but not much else is known about him.

George M. Beisel (18xx-xxxx) was with the 55th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K.

George S. Beisel (18xx-xxxx) served in the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D.

Harrison Beisel (18xx-xxxx) – no military regiment identified.

Henry H. Beisel (18xx-xxxx) was on the Beisel list of Civil War veterans-with no further identification.

Isaac A. Beisel (18xx-xxxx) served in the 198th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F.

John Beisel (1829-1890) a twin, was one of five brothers who served.  He was a member of the 82nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B and is buried in Drums Methodist Episcopal Cemetery, Drums, Luzerne County.

Nathan H. Beisel (18xx-1863), one of the four Beisel brother,was killed at Gettysburg while serving with the 151st Pennsylvania Infantry.

Peter Beisel(1827-1884), one of the five brothers, he served with the 153th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, and is buried in Drums Methodist Episcopal Cemetery, Drums, Luzerne County.

Reuben Beisel (1839-1897) one of the five brothers who served but not much else is known about his service.

Tilghman A. Beisel (1829-1879) the last member of the five brothers, was a member of the 176th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B and is buried in the St. John’s Cemetery, St. John’s, Lebanon County.

Samuel Bender (1836-1913) joined the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private for the Emergency Militia service of 1863.  He was from Perry County and was married to Martha Gray.

Peter S. Bergstresser (1836-1913), previously featured here on this blog, was a member of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry as well as the 192nd Pennsylvania Infantry where he served as a Captain.

John B. Beshler (1839-1869), a medical doctor who is buried at Peace Cemetery, Berrysburg, Dauphin County, served as an Assistant Surgeon at the headquarters of both the 81st Pennsylvania Infantry and the 88th Pennsylvania Infantry.

J. William Bettleyon (18xx-xxxx) was suggested for inclusion but more information is needed.

Andrew Betz (18xx-xxxx) is possibly the same person who is listed as Nathaniel Betz or Anthony Bates (18xx-xxxx).

William R. Bickel (1844-1911) served in the 195th Pennsylvania Infantry and is possibly the one listed in the Dalmatia, Northumberland County, list – or it might be a different one.

John H. Bickley (1838-1921) enrolled at Lykens Borough in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry claiming residence in Pottsville.  His occupation was given as overseer.  He was married to someone named Anna Maria and was living in New Jersey in 1890.

Nicholas Biddle (1796-1876) was a servant of Capt. James Wren and traveled to Baltimore with him and the First Defenders.  He was considered to be the first man whose blood was shed in the war. See post entitled:  Soldiers Monument of Schuylkill County.

Charles Biehl (1828-xxxx) was with the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He was an immigrant from Prussia and his wife’s name was Barbara.

Alexander Bingeman (1835-1896), the brother of William S. Bingeman who was a veteran, served with the 178th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company D, and is listed as deserter as of 12 November 1862.  He is buried in Stone Valley Cemetery, Hickory Corners, Northumberland County.

Daniel Binkley (1842-1864), a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, was captured and died of disease as a prisoner during the war.  He had enrolled at Pottsville, and was a laborer from Berks County with a wife named Harriet.

Edward Bixler (1845-1865), was captured and died of disease while a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  He was the brother of Jackson Bixler and was a laborer who was born in Dauphin County and enrolled at Pottsville.

Elias Bixler (1841-1920) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Corporal.  He was married to Emma or Malinda (or both) and is buried in St John’s Cemetery, Pine Grove, Schuylkill County.

Jackson Bixler (1845-xxxx), the brother of Edward Bixler, was a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  A laborer from Schuylkill County, he enrolled at Pottsville and during the war sustained a gunshot wound of the left arm.  His wife’s name was Mary and he is buried in the Harmony Cemetery, Milton, Northumberland County.

William H. Blanchford (1839-1912) also a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, injured his spine while helping to move a wounded soldier.  He was a 2nd Lieutenant in the company.  He married Mary Clemens Gottshall and is buried in the Vincent Mennonite Church Cemetery, Chester County.

Charles Blessing (18xx-xxxx), served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was a saddler from Hummelstown.  During the war he transferred to Company K and then, following an injury, became a member of the Veteran Reserve Corps.  His wife’s name was Jennie.

Joseph Blouser (18xx-xxxx), of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, was living in Hegins and Valley View, Schuylkill County, in 1890.  He suffered from dyspepsia at the time, which he blamed on his war service.

Preston John Blyler (1849-1933), also known as John Preston Blyler, was a member of the 13th Pennsyvlania Cavalry who was living in Hegins, Schuylkill County, in 1890.  He married Emma Bartho and is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.

William H. Blyler (1845-1905) was a resident of Gratz Borough, Dauphin County, who was working as a laborer.  He served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, but was listed as a deserter on 11 May 1864 at Spottsytlvania Court House, Virginia.  Later he was found in the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry lists for Company G and Company F.  He was married to Mary Elizabeth Beck.  The records may be confused for this individual because he used the alias “William Clinger.”

Matthias Deibler Bohner (1828-1885), who is buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, Trevorton, Northumberland County, served in the 136th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a 5th Sergeant.  He married Maria H. Rothermel.

Adam Bokle (1826-xxxx), as a member of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, deserted on 31 October 1863 at Louisville, Kentucky.  He was a powder manufacturer from Dauphin County.  It is believed that he was a German immigrant.  His name is found with various spellings including “Berkel,” “Berkle,” “Burkle” and “Burkel.”

Michael Boner (1839-1893) was born in Lancaster County and at the time of his enlistment in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, was residing in Berks County.  He was a laborer and is buried in Lancaster Cemetery, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.  His name is also found in the records as “Bower.”

Henry Bordner (1836-1892), a draftee from Dauphin County, served in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry as a Sergeant.  He was married to Emma M. Woods and possibly woman named Anna.  There are several persons with this name and the records may be co-mingled.  This Henry Bordner died in a Veterans’ Home in Marion, Indiana, and is buried in Marion National Cemetery.

Charles Albert Bosbyshell (1836-1915) was one of three brothers (and a twin) from near Pottsville who had Civil War service.  He was a member of the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, and the 39th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B (Emergency Militia of 1863).

Lebbeus Whitney Bosbyshell (1836-1886), the twin of Charles, served in the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Corporal.  He is buried in Charles Baber Cemetery, Pottsville.

Oliver Christian Bosbyshell (1839-1921) was a member of the Washington Artillists (First Defenders), the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, and the 25th Pennsylvania Infantry.  This brother of Charles Albert Bosbyshell and Lebbeus Whitney Bosbyshell went on to write a history of the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry and also became Director of the United States Mint in Philadelphia.

Peter Bowen (18xx-1922) is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County.  His Civil War service has not yet been identified.

John Bower (1838-xxxx) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He resided in Tremont, Schuylkill County, and worked as a laborer.

George Washington Bowerman (1841-1925) married Mary Ann Hoffman and is buried in the Methodist Episcopal Cemetery in Williamstown, Dauphin County.  He served in the 56th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Corporal.  In 1890, he lived in Carsonville, Wayne Township, Dauphin County.

C. L. Bowman (18xx-1914) is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County.  His Civil War service has not yet been identified.

Jacob Bowman (1843-xxxx) is named in the Halifax veterans’ list.  Since there are several identified persons with this name, more research is needed to separate the information and determine the regiment and company of service.

John A. Bowman (1836-xxxx) served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  The veteran of this regiment resided in Harrisburg and was a plasterer at the time of enrollment.  He enrolled at Lykens Borough, Dauphin County.

William Bowman (18xx-xxxx) is found in the Halifax, Dauphin County, veterans’ list but there are several person of this name who have been identified so more work has to be done to separate the records.

Lawrence Boyer (1835-1920) was a member of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, who later moved to Washington State.  His wife was Phoebe Elizabeth Faust.

Jeremiah B. Brandt (1833-xxxx) was a Captain in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, but he resigned on 26 July 1862 to serve as Assistant Surgeon in the 55th Pennsylvania Infantry, the 175th Pennsylvania Infantry, and the 110th Pennsylvania Infantry.  He is also credited with service as a Private in the 25th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B and Company H.  He married a woman named Esther and is buried in the Llewellyn Cemetery, Minersville, Schuylkill County.

Joseph Brenies (1846-xxxx), whose name is also found as “Brenice,” was a member of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  The records indicate that he was a substitute and deserter.  Not much else is known about him.

Henry Breslin (1846-1932) was from Pottsville and was a laborer.  He joined the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company F, as a Corporal.  He married Mary Daniel and is buried in the Irish Catholic Cemetery in Lykens Borough, Dauphin County.

Franklin Bressler (1846-1913), known as “Frank,” is buried in the Lutheran and Reformed Cemetery in Tremont, Schuylkill County.  He was a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  His wife’s name was Elizabeth and he was a laborer.

Martin Bressler (1847-1908) served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was born in Schuylkill County and enrolled at Pottsville.  He was a laborer, his wife’s name was Kate, and after the war he moved to Grinnell, Iowa, where he is buried in the Hazelwood Cemetery.  Iowa cemetery records indicate he was a member of the G.A.R.

Patrick Blesson (1846-xxxx) [aka Patrick Brown] applied for a pension from Massachusetts giving an alias.  He served as a member of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private, and during the war he was held prisoner for about five months.  He originally enrolled at Philadelphia.  The records also show that he served in the Regular Army with the artillery.

Anthony Paul Bretz (1825-1909) is buried at Calvary Cemetery, Wiconisco, and the possibility exists that he could have served in one or more regiments.  It’s also possible that this is the same person as Anthony Betz.

Franklin Bretz (1842-1899) was a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, enrolling at Freemont (probably a typographical error – should be Tremont?).  He was a laborer and born in Schuylkill County.  He married someone named Elizabeth.  He is buried in Hetzel’s Rock Cemetery, Pine Grove, Schuylkill County.

John H. Bricker (1834-xxxx) was born in Lancaster County but lived in Dauphin County at the time of his enrollment in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, as a Private.  He was a boat maker and his wife’s name was Ann.

Henry Brodt (1833-1890) was a Captain in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  It is believed that he was an immigrant from France.  His wife’s name was Maria and he is buried in Clauser’s Cemetery, Branch Township, Schuylkill County.

Edward Brown (1842-xxxx) served in the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, as a Private.  At the time of enrollment, he was a mason residing in Lykens, Dauphin County.

James Brown (18xx-xxxx) is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County, and it is believed he was a Civil War veteran although no regiment and company has been identified.

John M. Brown (1836-1914) of Tremont, Schuylkill County, in buried in Pine Grove, Schuylkill County.  He served in the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K, as a Private.  His wife was Rebecca Zerbe.  John’s service is recognized with a brick at Wiscount Veteran’s Memorial Park in Tremont.

John M. Brubaker (1842-1917) could be confused with other persons of the name John Brubaker, of which there were several who resided in the Lykens Valley area.  It’s possible that this is one who served in the 34th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K (Emergency Militia of 1863), as a Private, was married to Hannah Martin, and is buried at Otterbein Cemetery, East Salem, Juniata County.  See post:  Who was John Brubaker?  John R. Brubaker (18xx-1923) is probably the one buried at Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg, Dauphin County.

Samuel H. Brubaker (18xx-xxxx) was a draftee from dauphin County who saw service as a Private in the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I.

Charles Napoleon Brumm (1838-1917) married Virginia Marlin James.  He was the brother of George W. Brumm.  After his service in the 76th Pennsylvania Infantry as Quartermaster and 1st Lieutenant and service in the 5th Pennsylvania Infantry, he was elected to the United States Congress.

Isaac Bubb (1835-1864) was killed in action near Marietta, Georgia, and is buried in the Marietta National Cemetery.  After serving in the 36th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F (Militia of 1863), he joined the Regular Army as a private.  There is another person of the same name and some of the records may be confused, but the one of this record is the one who was killed in Marietta.

John Buchen (1840-xxxx), a member of the 10th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company F, was a Private who claimed that he was a resident of Lykens Borough, Dauphin County, and a miner when he enrolled at Lykens.

Miles W. Buck (1848-1909), a twin of Milton Buck, served in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, as a Private.  He was later transferred to Company K.  At the time of his enrollment, he declared residency in Lehigh County and was a laborer.  It’s possible that this is the same person who was also in the Regular Army and made a career there, including service in an army band.  His wife’s name was Hannah and he is buried in Grazierville Cemetery, Tyrone, Blair County.

Henry B. Buehler (1835-xxxx) was also known as “H.B.” and for a short time was a medical doctor in Gratz Borough, Dauphin County.  He was married to a woman named Elizabeth Christine.  During the Civil War he was Assistant Surgeon with the 11th Pennsylvania Infantry.  After serving as a doctor in Harrisburg, he took over his father’s insurance business there and became one of the most successful agents in Pennsylvania in the post-war period.  He was also active in the G.A.R. in Harrisburg and was one of the movers behind the building of the Dauphin County Civil War Monument.

Ernst Buhler (1845-xxxx) was born in Germany and took up residence in Jefferson Township, Dauphin County.  During the war he served in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.  After the war he moved to Illinois and applied for a pension from there in 1920, but a pension was never awarded.

Joseph Buffington (1843-xxxx) is buried in St. James Cemetery, Carsonville, Dauphin County.  It’s possible that this is the same person who is already named in the Halifax list and/or the same person whose sister may have married Louis Goudy.  Military service was in the 103rd Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G, as a Private.

George Johann Burkle (1838-1904) served in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.  At enlistment he resided in Luzerne County.  He was born in Germany and was by occupation a baker.  During the war, he got sick, and while in the hospital was reduced to the rank of Private.  After he returned to service, a claim was made that he fired the last gun of the Civil War.  He used the notoriety as a means of becoming a politician in Scranton, Luzerne County.  He married Amelia Justian Puester and is buried in Forest Hill Cemetery, Scranton, Luzerne County.

C

Carl Conrad (1843-1864), a Private in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, was killed at the Wilderness, Virginia, 9 May 1864.  According to his enrollment data, he resided in Wiconisco, Dauphin County, and was a laborer.

John Carl (1835-xxxx), who is buried in the Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Shamokin, Northumberland County, was a Sergeant in Company A of the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Franklin Cash (1839-xxxx) was a sailor from Boston, Massachusetts who later resided in Chester County.  He was wounded at Averysboro, North Carolina, 16 March 1865, while serving as a Private in the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B.

Benjamin Charlesworth (1830-1897) was living in Tower City, Schuylkill County, in 1890.  His name also appears in the Tower City veterans’ list.  He served in the 27th Pennsylvania Infantry (Militia), Company I for the Emergency of 1863.  His wife’s name was Elizabeth.

William Henry Chubb (1844-1914) is buried in Pittsfield Cemetery, Pittsfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts.  He was a Private in Company A of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry.  He joined the company as a substitute at Easton, Pennsylvania.  His wife’s name was Margaretha Anna.  After the war he moved first to New York where he applied for a pension and then to Massachusetts.

Andrew M. Clark (1839-xxxx) of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company B, served as a Corporal before eventually being commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant.  He was a resident of Wayne County.

Edward W. Clark (1842-1864) was captured and died as a prisoner while in service of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A.  This Private was born in Northumberland County but resided in Schuylkill County when he enlisted at Pottsville.  At the time he was a laborer and was married to Ellen T. Currier.

William H. Clark (1838-1864) is also found as William F. Clark in the records.  He was killed at the Weldon Railroad, 19 August 1864.  In 1861, he had enrolled in the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A, at Mahantongo, Northumberland County and was a resident of Klingerstown where he worked as a laborer.

David Ramsey Clendenin (1830-1895) was born in Lancaster County and during the Civil War served as a Lieutenant Colonel with the 8th Illinois Cavalry.  He was breveted Brigadier General and was appointed to the Military Tribunal for the Lincoln assassination.

Daniel Mountjoy Cloud (1837-1871) was a member of the  Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Class of 1857.  During the Civil War, he served as a Full 2nd Sergeant of the 7th Virginia Cavalry (Confederate).  He is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi.  He has been connected to the 1864 plot to kidnap Abraham Lincoln.

Simon H. Clouser (1842-1874, also known as “Simon H. Clauser,” is buried in the Clauser Cemetery, Branch Township, Schuylkill County.  He received several promotions until he achieved the rank of Quartermaster Sergeant at the Headquarters of the 50th Pennsylvania Infantry.  His wife’s name was Sarah J. and his enrollment in the infantry was at Pottsville.

John C. Cole (18xx-1864) died at City Point, Virginia, of wounds received at Petersburg, Virginia, while a member of the 43rd U.S. Colored Troops (USCT).  He was from Pottsville.

Charles Coleman (1844-1915), a draftee of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, was a resident of Dauphin County.  He was married to Lydia Mathilda Rine.

Thomas Nelson Conrad (1837-1905) was a member of the  Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Class of 1857.  During the Civil War, he served as the Chaplain of the 3rd Virginia Cavalry, Company S (Confederate).  He is buried in Blacksburg, Virginia.  He has been connected to the 1864 plot to kidnap Abraham Lincoln.

Jay Cooke (1821-1905) was a Philadelphia financier.  He is buried in St. Paul’s Episcopal Churchyard, Elkins Park, Montgomery County.  No military service has been located for him.

John Corey (18xx-xxxx) was a member of Thompson’s Battery, Light Artillery who was attending the play, Our American Cousin, on 14 April 1865, and has been credited with carrying Lincoln across the street to the Petersen House.

Horace Gates Crabb (1830-1903) [aka Homer Nelson Gates?] has some connection with Sunbury and Northumberland County.  He was a West Point graduate but no Civil War connection has been located.

Jeremiah Crabb (1826-1899) is possibly a member of the Crabb family of Gratz, who for some unknown reason was located in the post-Civil War records of the 24th U.S. Colored Troops at a fort in Spokane, Washington in the 1890s.  He is buried at Greenwood Cemetery, Spokane.  Two different names appear as possible wives:  Lucrea (or Lucretia) and Mary.

William Clevenger Crabb (1808-1876) has a possible connection with the Crabb family of Gratz.  He was found in the records of Fayette County and Ross County, Ohio, but no Civil War service has been located for him or for his descendants.

Albert G. Cummings (1844-1911) served in the 1st New Hampshire Infantry, Company F, as a Private and was promoted to the rank of Captain in the 5th New Hampshire Infantry.  After the Civil War, he located in Millersburg, Dauphin County.  He married Ellen T. Currier and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Millersburg.

Andrew Gregg Curtin (1815-1895) was the Civil War Governor of Pennsylvania and was commander-in-chief of the Pennsylvania state forces.  He served from 1861-1867.  Curtin married Catherine Irvine Wilson and is buried in Union Cemetery, Bellefonte, Centre County.

John I. Curtin (1837-1911) was Gov. Andrew Gregg Curtin‘s cousin.  He served in the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry as a Private, and the 45th Pennsylvania Infantry as a Captain, and eventually rose to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General.  He is buried in Union Cemetery, Bellefonte, Centre County.

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The list will continue tomorrow with surnames beginning with D through F.


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