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Civil War Blog

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Isaac Holland – Military & Masonic Funeral

Posted By on March 27, 2012

 

ISAAC HOLLAND GIVEN MILITARY & MASONIC FUNERAL

LYKENS, 23 November 1928. –Isaac William Holland, 84, Civil War Veteran, was buried in Wiconisco Monday with military and Masonic rites.  He died Thursday at Huntsville, Alabama, where he resided with a granddaughter for the past two years.  His body was brought to Wiconisco Sunday.

Services were held at 2:30 o’clock at the residence of a niece, Mrs. Anzella Dodd, with further services at the Wiconisco Methodist Episcopal Church, the Rev. Howard A. Brettle officiating.

The body was borne from the home to the church on a caisson draped with the American flag.  In the cortege was a contingent of John Yonascak Post American Legion with color bearers, Woman’s Relief Corps, mounted escort from the Governor’s Troops, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Wiconisco Band, a firing squad, members of Ashland Lodge, F. & A. M., of Lykens, the children of the Wiconisco schools and scores of friends.

The school children saluted as the body was carried from the church and the band rendered “Nearer, My God, To Thee.”  As the body was borne form the church the band played “Rock of Ages.”  The procession moved to the Wiconisco Cemetery where, after the Masonic rites were performed, a volley was fired and taps were sounded.  The Rev. Mr. Raebuck, pastor of the Evangelical Church of Wiconisco, offered a prayer.

Born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1844, Mr. Holland enlisted twice in the Federal forces, first in the 21st Cavalry [21st Pennsylvania Cavalry] and then in the 99th Pennsylvania Volunteers [99th Pennsylvania Infantry].  After the war he came to Wiconisco where he married Miss Harriet Workman in 1868.  His wife died 18 years ago.

Mr. Holland directed the construction of the old road from Millersburg to Williamstown.  For forty-six years he was a section foreman of the Pennsylvania Railroad, being retired by the company.  He was a member of Perseverance Lodge, No. 21, F. & A. M. Harrisburg, and of the Methodist Church, Wiconisco, Pennsylvania, for 53 years.

Surviving are two sons, Clarence Holland, Wiconisco, and Edward Holland of Wheeling, West Virginia, a sister, 94 years old in Maryland, and a step brother George Myers, of Manheim.  His son Clarence Holland is a retired naval officer.

Mr. Holland was the last surviving Civil War Veteran from Wiconisco and one of the best known residents of the valley.  A gallant soldier, a loving character, and Christian gentleman.

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MILITARY AND MASONIC RITES FOR WAR VET

WICONISCO, Nov. 28 – Isaac William Holland, 84, Civil War veteran was buried here yesterday with military and Masonic rites.  He died Thursday at Huntsville, Alabama, where he had gone two weeks ago to visit a niece.  His body was brought here Sunday.

Services were held at 2:30 o’clock at the residence of a niece, Mrs. Auzella Dodd, with further services at the Wiconisco Methodist Church, the Rev. Howard A. Brettle, officiating.

The body was borne from the home to the church on a caisson draped with the American flag.  In the cortege were a contingent of the American legion with color bearers, the Wiconisco Band, a firing squad, members of Ashler Lodge, F. & A. M., of Lykens, the children of the Wiconisco schools and scores of friends.

The school children saluted as the body was carried from the church.  The procession moved to the Wiconisco Cemetery, where, after the Masonic rites were performed, a volley was fired and taps were blown.  The Rev. Mr. Roebuck, pastor of the Evangelical Church here, offered a prayer.

Born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1844, Mr. Holland enlisted twice in the Federal forces, first in the 21st Cavalry [21st Pennsylvania Cavalry] and then in the 99th Pennsylvania Volunteers [99th Pennsylvania Infantry].  After the war he came to Wiconisco where he married Miss Harriet Workman in 1868.  His wife died eighteen years ago.

Mr. Holland directed the construction of the old road from Lykens to Williamstown.  For thirty-seven years he was a section foreman of the Pennsylvania Railroad, being retired by the company.  He was a member of Perseverance Lodge, No. 21, F. & A. M., Harrisburg, and of the Methodist Church of this place.

Surviving are two sons, Clarence Holland, of this place, and Edward Holland, of Wheeling, West Virginia, a sister, 94 years old, in Maryland, and a step brother, George Myers, of Manheim.  His son, Clarence Holland, now a retired naval officer, was the youngest member of the Navy, having enlisted at the age of 14.

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Isaac W. Holland is buried in Calvary United Methodist Cemetery, Wiconisco, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  The following information was provided in a previous post:

Isaac W. Holland (1844-1928).  Some sources give the birth year as 1845,  He first served in the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry, Company G, as a Private for a six month term from 15 July 1863 to 20 February 1864.  Then he joined the 99th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company C, as a Private, mustered in 6 March 1864, promoted to Corporal on 1 Mar 1865, and discharged on 1 July 1865.  Isaac married Harriet Workman in 1869.  He lived in Lykens and Wiconisco where he spent most of his working years as a track foreman for the Summit Branch Railroad.  Toward the end of his life he became senile and his family could not take care of him so he was sent to live in a Veteran’s Home in Hampton, Virginia.

Pennsylvania Veterans’ Index Card entries for Isaac W. Holland are shown below:

For his Civil War service, Isaac W. Holland applied for an received a pension as indicated on the Pension Index Card shown below.  Pension Index Cards are available through Ancestry.com.

The record sheet from the Veterans’ Home in Hampton, Virginia, 1914,  gives information about Isaac W. Holland‘s military service and physical ailments:

Click on document to enlarge.

Since Isaac W. Holland was discharged from the Veterans’ Home years before his death, there is no information on the sheet indicating how and when he died.  For veterans who died at Soldiers’ Homes, cause of death and place of burial are often included on the record.  The Veterans’ Home records are available through Ancestry.com.

Alabama death certificates (1908-1959) for the early part of the 20th century area available through Ancestry.com.  The death certificate for Isaac W. Holland is shown below, indicating the cause of death as “senility.”

Click on document to enlarge.

In recognition of his Civil War service, Isaac W. Holland was named on the Lykens G.A.R. Monument:

The obituary and funeral information from local newspapers was provided by Sally Reiner of the Lykens-Wiconisco Historical Society from her collection of newspaper clippings on the history of the Lykens-Wiconisco area. Additional information about Isaac W. Holland from his pension files is available at the Gratz Historical Society.  However, more information is sought, and readers are invited to contribute.  Of particular interest is Harriet [Workman] Holland and her relations, including the possibility that she was related to Sallie [Workman] Keiser, the wife of Henry Keiser who was very active in the G.A.R. in Lykens and who has been the subject of several previous blog posts.


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