;

Civil War Blog

A project of PA Historian

They Paid Subs – 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I

Posted By on October 15, 2011

The blog post today presents four individuals who were drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, and who reported to Camp Curtin as required on 2 November 1862.  Each found and paid a substitute to serve for him and thus were discharged from the regiment on the date indicated.

Pennsylvania Veterans’ Index Cards are from the Pennsylvania Archives.  The roll of the 177th Pennsyvlania Infantry, Company I, is also available at the Pennsylvania Archivespage 1; Company I, page 2; Company I, page 3; and Company I, page 4Benjamin J. Evitts of Lykens Township and Gratz Borough was Captain of Company I.  Prior posts on Benjamin J. Evitts can be located by clicking on the tag, “Evitts Family.”  For prior posts on the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, click here.

——————————

 

BENNEVILLE DANIEL.  Born about 1825.  Also found in records as Beniville and Benwell.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  According to some secondary sources (click on name), he deserted on 17 November 1862, but roll of the company from Pennsylvania Archives indicates that he was discharged because he got a substitute to serve in Robert’s Artillery on 17 November 1862.  The Civil War Draft Registration confirms that he sent a substitute as shown below (click on picture to enlarge).  Benneville Daniel was a farmer from Lykens Township.

——————————

GEORGE ROMBERGER.  Born about 1837.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in on 2 November 1862, by Lt. Fetterman.  Discharged on 18 November 1862 because he obtained a substitute to serve in the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry.  Romberger was from Mifflin Township, Dauphin County, and was a farmer.  After the war he married Elizabeth Bressler.  He is buried in St. John (Hill) Church Cemetery, Berrysburg.

The entry line from the roll of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, for George Romberger is shown above.  The roll is found at the Pennsylvania Archives.

——————————

 

 

EDWARD SHADE.  Born about 1841.  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Discharged for substitute in 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry on 20 November 1862.  An Edward Shade was located in the Hubley Township, Schuylkill County Draft Registration records and could be the same person who found the substitute, although nothing is noted on the Draft Registration record.  The Schuylkill County person named Edward Shade was born about 1841 and no other person named Edward Shade was found in the records of the general geographic area.  Edward Shade of Schuylkill County was a farmer and was married to Priscilla Klinger who was a descendant of the Artz family from around Sacramento, Schuylkill County.  Edward Shade died around 1916.

The entry line from the roll of the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, for Edward Shade is shown above.  The roll is found at the Pennsylvania Archives.

——————————

 

BAILEY H. WAMBAUGH.  Born about 1836.  Also found in records as Bailey, Baly, Baley and “R. H.”  Draftee from Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Mustered in 2 November 1862 by Capt. Norton.  Discharged for substitute in 3-year regiment on 2 November 1864.  While Steve Maczuga’s database indicates he was discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificate of Disability, the Pennsylvania Archives’ roll of the regiment indicates he was discharged because he obtained a substitute.  The 1863 United States Civil War Draft Register shown above for Mifflin Township, Dauphin County, confirms that this is the same person in that he obtained a substitute for three years.  Bailey Wambaugh was a shoemaker who was living in Halifax in 1850 in the household of George Bailey, a farmer.  At this time, it is not known what happened to Bailey Wambaugh after he was recorded in the 1863 draft registration.

——————————

Civil War Draft Registration forms are from Ancestry.com.

The Civil War Research Project is seeking more information on the draftees who were sent home from Company I, 177th Pennsylvania Infantry because they obtained substitutes, particularly those from Dauphin County.  The men named above may not previously been included in the Civil War Research Project, but if they have a geographic connection to the Lykens Valley area, they should be included – whether or not they served in other units during the war.  The fact that they reported for duty is enough for them to be included in the Pennsylvania statistics and in most of the databases of Civil War soldiers.  The discharge they obtained, by paying a substitute, was done in accordance with the law.

Future posts will focus on other men who were drafted into the 177th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company I, including those who served the full term of nine months.


Comments

Leave a Reply

Please note: Comment moderation is currently enabled so there will be a delay between when you post your comment and when it shows up. Patience is a virtue; there is no need to re-submit your comment.